Blog
About

12
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      A Review of Cell-Based Computational Modeling in Cancer Biology

      , MS 1 , , MS 1 ,   , MA 1 ,   , PhD 1

      JCO clinical cancer informatics

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Cancer biology involves complex, dynamic interactions between cancer cells and their tissue microenvironments. Single-cell effects are critical drivers of clinical progression. Chemical and mechanical communication between tumor and stromal cells can co-opt normal physiologic processes to promote growth and invasion. Cancer cell heterogeneity increases cancer’s ability to test strategies to adapt to microenvironmental stresses. Hypoxia and treatment can select for cancer stem cells and drive invasion and resistance. Cell-based computational models (also known as discrete models, agent-based models, or individual-based models) simulate individual cells as they interact in virtual tissues, which allows us to explore how single-cell behaviors lead to the dynamics we observe and work to control in cancer systems. In this review, we introduce the broad range of techniques available for cell-based computational modeling. The approaches can range from highly detailed models of just a few cells and their morphologies to millions of simpler cells in three-dimensional tissues. Modeling individual cells allows us to directly translate biologic observations into simulation rules. In many cases, individual cell agents include molecular-scale models. Most models also simulate the transport of oxygen, drugs, and growth factors, which allow us to link cancer development to microenvironmental conditions. We illustrate these methods with examples drawn from cancer hypoxia, angiogenesis, invasion, stem cells, and immuno-surveillance. An ecosystem of interoperable cell-based simulation tools is emerging at a time when cloud computing resources make software easier to access and supercomputing resources make large-scale simulation studies possible. As the field develops, we anticipate that high-throughput simulation studies will allow us to rapidly explore the space of biologic possibilities, prescreen new therapeutic strategies, and even re-engineer tumor and stromal cells to bring cancer systems under control.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 91

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found

          Hallmarks of Cancer: The Next Generation

          The hallmarks of cancer comprise six biological capabilities acquired during the multistep development of human tumors. The hallmarks constitute an organizing principle for rationalizing the complexities of neoplastic disease. They include sustaining proliferative signaling, evading growth suppressors, resisting cell death, enabling replicative immortality, inducing angiogenesis, and activating invasion and metastasis. Underlying these hallmarks are genome instability, which generates the genetic diversity that expedites their acquisition, and inflammation, which fosters multiple hallmark functions. Conceptual progress in the last decade has added two emerging hallmarks of potential generality to this list-reprogramming of energy metabolism and evading immune destruction. In addition to cancer cells, tumors exhibit another dimension of complexity: they contain a repertoire of recruited, ostensibly normal cells that contribute to the acquisition of hallmark traits by creating the "tumor microenvironment." Recognition of the widespread applicability of these concepts will increasingly affect the development of new means to treat human cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The hallmarks of cancer.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The Hallmarks of Cancer

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                101708809
                46709
                JCO Clin Cancer Inform
                JCO Clin Cancer Inform
                JCO clinical cancer informatics
                2473-4276
                14 June 2019
                February 2019
                20 June 2019
                : 3
                : 1-13
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Indiana University, Bloomington, IN.
                Author notes

                AUTHOR CONTRIBUTIONS

                Conception and design: John Metzcar, Paul Macklin

                Financial support: Paul Macklin

                Collection and assembly of data: John Metzcar, Yafei Wang, Randy Heiland

                Manuscript writing: All authors

                Final approval of manuscript: All authors

                Accountable for all aspects of the work: All authors

                CORRESPONDING AUTHOR: Paul Macklin, PhD, Department of Intelligent Systems Engineering, Indiana University, 4128 Luddy Hall, 700 N Woodlawn Ave, Bloomington, IN 47408; Twitter: @MathCancer; macklinp@ 123456iu.edu .
                Article
                NIHMS1032859
                10.1200/CCI.18.00069
                6584763
                30715927

                Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article