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      Effects of Audience Response Systems on Student Achievement and Long-Term Retention

      Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
      Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd

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          Abstract

          The effects of audience response systems (ARS) on students' academic success and their perceptions of ARS were examined in this study. Participants, comprising 44 undergraduate students, were randomly assigned to a control or treatment group. The course design was the same for both groups and the instructor prepared the multiple-choice questions in advance; students in the control group responded to these questions verbally whereas the treatment group used ARS. Two paper-based examinations were used to measure the learning of concepts and skills that were taught. Students' perceptions of ARS were collected via a questionnaire. Results showed that ARS usage has a significant learning achievement effect in the first 4 weeks but not at the end of the second 4 weeks. There was no significant difference in retention between either group. Students perceived the ARS tool positively, finding it very enjoyable and useful.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal
          soc behav pers
          Scientific Journal Publishers Ltd
          0301-2212
          November 01 2011
          November 01 2011
          : 39
          : 10
          : 1431-1439
          Article
          10.2224/sbp.2011.39.10.1431
          6d819ebf-193b-4809-89d9-ac830c3d523f
          © 2011
          History

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