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Terapia hormonal en la transición femenino a masculino (ftm), androgénica, para trans masculino o para hombre transgénero

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      Abstract

      RESUMEN La transexualidad, o el ser transgénero según la nomenclatura actual, describe a personas que persistentemente buscan ser aceptados como miembros del sexo opuesto, desean cambiar sus caracteres sexuales primarios y/o secundarios a través de intervenciones médicas tanto hormonales como quirúrgicas para feminizarse o masculinizarse. (Tabla 1) Esta discordancia entre su “sexo biológico” y “psicológico” genera estrés clínicamente significativo con rechazo profundo al cuerpo del sexo anatómico, al género asignado al nacer y, por ende, alteración persistente en el funcionamiento diario (mayor a 6 meses), se denomina disforia de género, sienten que nacieron en el “cuerpo equivocado”. El objetivo de la intervención médica es mejorar la disforia de género y, por consiguiente, mejora el bienestar y la calidad de vida de las personas trans. En Revista de la Sociedad Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecología Infantil y de la Adolescencia, recientemente hemos publicado dos artículos de revisión sobre la introducción a la Hormonoterapia en personas transexuales, objetivos de la terapia, transición en la adolescencia, y la transición masculino a femenino, por lo que éste escrito se concentrará sólo en la Terapia Hormonal de la transición femenino a Masculino (FTM), son personas que transitan de Mujer a Hombre, o transgénero masculino o trans masculino. (1,2)

      Translated abstract

      ABSTRACT Transsexuality, or being transgender according to the current nomenclature, describes people who persistently seek to be accepted as members of the opposite sex, wish to change their primary and / or secondary sexual characteristics through both hormonal and surgical medical interventions to feminize or masculinize themselves. (Table 1) This discordance between their "biological" and "psychological" sex, generates clinically significant stress with profound rejection of the body of the anatomical sex, the gender assigned at birth and, therefore, persistent alteration in daily functioning (more than 6 months), is called gender dysphoria feel that they were born in the “wrong Body”. The goal of medical intervention is to improve gender dysphoria and, consequently, improve the well-being and quality of life of transgender people. In the Journal of the Chilean Society of Obstetrics and Child and Adolescent Gynecology, we have recently published two review articles on the introduction of Hormonotherapy in transgender people, goals of therapy, transition in adolescence, and the male-to-female transition, so this paper will focus only on Hormonal Therapy of the female to male transition (FTM), are people who transit from woman to man, or male trans, male transgender. (1,2)

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      Breast Cancer Screening for Women at Average Risk: 2015 Guideline Update From the American Cancer Society.

      Breast cancer is a leading cause of premature mortality among US women. Early detection has been shown to be associated with reduced breast cancer morbidity and mortality.
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        Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender-related content in undergraduate medical education.

        Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals experience health and health care disparities and have specific health care needs. Medical education organizations have called for LGBT-sensitive training, but how and to what extent schools educate students to deliver comprehensive LGBT patient care is unknown. To characterize LGBT-related medical curricula and associated curricular development practices and to determine deans' assessments of their institutions' LGBT-related curricular content. Deans of medical education (or equivalent) at 176 allopathic or osteopathic medical schools in Canada and the United States were surveyed to complete a 13-question, Web-based questionnaire between May 2009 and March 2010. Reported hours of LGBT-related curricular content. Of 176 schools, 150 (85.2%) responded, and 132 (75.0%) fully completed the questionnaire. The median reported time dedicated to teaching LGBT-related content in the entire curriculum was 5 hours (interquartile range [IQR], 3-8 hours). Of the 132 respondents, 9 (6.8%; 95% CI, 2.5%-11.1%) reported 0 hours taught during preclinical years and 44 (33.3%; 95% CI, 25.3%-41.4%) reported 0 hours during clinical years. Median US allopathic clinical hours were significantly different from US osteopathic clinical hours (2 hours [IQR, 0-4 hours] vs 0 hours [IQR, 0-2 hours]; P = .008). Although 128 of the schools (97.0%; 95% CI, 94.0%-99.9%) taught students to ask patients if they "have sex with men, women, or both" when obtaining a sexual history, the reported teaching frequency of 16 LGBT-specific topic areas in the required curriculum was lower: at least 8 topics at 83 schools (62.9%; 95% CI, 54.6%-71.1%) and all topics at 11 schools (8.3%; 95% CI, 3.6%-13.0%). The institutions' LGBT content was rated as "fair" at 58 schools (43.9%; 95% CI, 35.5%-52.4%). Suggested successful strategies to increase content included curricular material focusing on LGBT-related health and health disparities at 77 schools (58.3%, 95% CI, 49.9%-66.7%) and faculty willing and able to teach LGBT-related curricular content at 67 schools (50.8%, 95% CI, 42.2%-59.3%). The median reported time dedicated to LGBT-related topics in 2009-2010 was small across US and Canadian medical schools, but the quantity, content covered, and perceived quality of instruction varied substantially.
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          Endocrine Treatment of Gender-Dysphoric/Gender-Incongruent Persons: An Endocrine Society* Clinical Practice Guideline

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Santiago de Chile orgnameUniversidad de Chile orgdiv1Hospital Clínico orgdiv2Departamento Obstetricia y Ginecología Chile
            Santiago de Chile orgnameUniversidad de Chile orgdiv1Hospital Clínico orgdiv2Departamento Obstetricia y Ginecología Chile
            Santiago de Chile orgnameComplejo Asistencial Doctor Sótero del Río orgdiv1Servicio de Medicina orgdiv2Departamento de Endocrinología Chile
            Santiago de Chile orgnameUniversidad de Chile orgdiv1Servicio Endocrinología Chile
            Santiago de Chile orgnameUniversidad de Chile orgdiv1Hospital Clínico orgdiv2Departamento Obstetricia y Ginecología Chile
            Santiago de Chile orgnameUniversidad de Chile orgdiv1Facultad de Medicina Chile
            orgnameUniversidad Andrés Bello orgdiv1Departamento de Obstetricia y Ginecología Chile
            Contributors
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Role: ND
            Journal
            rchog
            Revista chilena de obstetricia y ginecología
            Rev. chil. obstet. ginecol.
            Sociedad Chilena de Obstetricia y Ginecología (Santiago, , Chile )
            0048-766X
            0717-7526
            June 2018
            : 83
            : 3
            : 318-328
            S0717-75262018000300318 10.4067/s0717-75262018000300319

            This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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            Figures: 0, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 33, Pages: 11
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            Product Information: SciELO Chile

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