3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Magnetic compass mediates nocturnal homing by the alpine newt, Triturus alpestris

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          Magnetic Orientation in Animals

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Two magnetoreception pathways in a migratory salamander.

            Male eastern red-spotted newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) under controlled laboratory conditions exhibit unimodal magnetic compass orientation either in a trained compass direction or in the direction of their home pond. If the vertical component of the magnetic field is inverted, newts exhibiting the simple-compass response undergo a 180 degree reversal in orientation, whereas newts orienting in the home direction are unaffected by this treatment. These results indicate that newts use an axial compass mechanism for simple-compass orientation similar to that found in migrating birds. However, a distinct magnetoreception pathway with polar response properties is involved in homing and is possibly linked in some way to the navigational map.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Behavioural evidence for use of a light-dependent magnetoreception mechanism by a vertebrate

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
                Behav Ecol Sociobiol
                Springer Nature
                0340-5443
                1432-0762
                August 2005
                April 2005
                : 58
                : 4
                : 361-365
                Article
                10.1007/s00265-005-0951-5
                6db3ae7b-6a8a-4639-987b-300005b155f1
                © 2005
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article