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      Androgen receptor enhances myogenin expression and accelerates differentiation.

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      Biochemical and biophysical research communications

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          Abstract

          Animal and clinical studies indicated that the androgen-AR signaling pathway is required for appropriate development of sexually dimorphic skeletal muscles and increases lean muscle mass, muscle strength, and muscle protein synthesis. However, the detailed mechanisms by which the androgen-AR signaling pathway regulates skeletal muscle development need further study at the molecular level. C2C12 myoblast cells stably transfected with the Flag-tagged AR were used to analyze the role of androgen-AR signaling pathway in skeletal muscle development. The results indicate that the androgen-AR signaling pathway may suppress skeletal myoblast cell growth and accelerate myoblast cell differentiation via enhanced myogenin expression. This is a first report showing the role of androgen-AR signaling pathway in regulation of myoblast cell growth and myogenic regulatory factors.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
          Biochemical and biophysical research communications
          0006-291X
          0006-291X
          Jun 7 2002
          : 294
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 626, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. dongkun_lee@urmc.rochester.edu
          Article
          S0006-291X(02)00504-1
          10.1016/S0006-291X(02)00504-1
          12051727
          (c) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

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