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      The biomarker sex hormone-binding globulin - from established applications to emerging trends in clinical medicine.

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          Abstract

          Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) is a serum glycoprotein exhibiting the unique feature of binding sex steroids with high affinity and specificity. Its serum levels are regulated not only by androgens and estrogens but also by thyroid hormones and other metabolic factors. Several disease conditions are accompanied by altered SHBG levels such as hyper- and hypoandrogenism, thyroid disorders, pituitary diseases, liver disorders, and breast as well as prostate cancer. Additionally, several drugs and alcohol consumption influence serum concentrations of SHBG. In some cases, altered SHBG levels are a specific result of the underlying pathology. In others, they merely constitute an epiphenomenon, which still might offer the possibility of using serum measurements of SHBG as surrogate marker. This review article portrays the different disorders associated with altered SHBG levels and discusses the usefulness of SHBG as disease biomarker from a clinicians as well as from an endocrinological researchers point of view.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Best Pract. Res. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
          Best practice & research. Clinical endocrinology & metabolism
          Elsevier BV
          1878-1594
          1521-690X
          Oct 2015
          : 29
          : 5
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Institut für Klinische Chemie und Pathobiochemie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München, Germany. Electronic address: thaler@klinchem.med.tum.de.
          [2 ] Frauenklinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München, Germany. Electronic address: Vanadin.Seifert-Klauss@lrz.tu-muenchen.de.
          [3 ] Institut für Klinische Chemie und Pathobiochemie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der TU München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 München, Germany. Electronic address: luppa@klinchem.med.tum.de.
          Article
          S1521-690X(15)00066-4
          10.1016/j.beem.2015.06.005
          26522459

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