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      Size control of the inner ear via hydraulic feedback

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          SUMMARY

          Animals make organs of precise size, shape, and symmetry despite noise in underlying molecular and cellular processes. How developing organs manage this noise is largely unknown. Here, we combine quantitative imaging, physical theory, and physiological measurement of hydrostatic pressure and fluid transport in zebrafish to study size control of the developing inner ear. We find that fluid accumulation creates hydrostatic pressure in the lumen leading to stress in the epithelium and expansion of the otic vesicle. Pressure, in turn, inhibits fluid transport into the lumen. This negative feedback loop between pressure and transport allows the otic vesicle to change growth rate to control natural or experimentally-induced size variation. Spatiotemporal patterning of contractility modulates pressure-driven strain for regional tissue thinning. Our work connects moleculardriven mechanisms, such as osmotic pressure driven strain and actomyosin tension, to the regulation of tissue morphogenesis via hydraulic feedback to ensure robust control of organ size.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          bioRxiv
          June 19 2018
          Article
          10.1101/349381
          © 2018
          Product

          Developmental biology, Ecology

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