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      Sepsis and septic shock

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          Abstract

          For more than two decades, sepsis was defined as a microbial infection that produces fever (or hypothermia), tachycardia, tachypnoea and blood leukocyte changes. Sepsis is now increasingly being considered a dysregulated systemic inflammatory and immune response to microbial invasion that produces organ injury for which mortality rates are declining to 15–25%. Septic shock remains defined as sepsis with hyperlactataemia and concurrent hypotension requiring vasopressor therapy, with in-hospital mortality rates approaching 30–50%. With earlier recognition and more compliance to best practices, sepsis has become less of an immediate life-threatening disorder and more of a long-term chronic critical illness, often associated with prolonged inflammation, immune suppression, organ injury and lean tissue wasting. Furthermore, patients who survive sepsis have continuing risk of mortality after discharge, as well as long-term cognitive and functional deficits. Earlier recognition and improved implementation of best practices have reduced in-hospital mortality, but results from the use of immunomodulatory agents to date have been disappointing. Similarly, no biomarker can definitely diagnose sepsis or predict its clinical outcome. Because of its complexity, improvements in sepsis outcomes are likely to continue to be slow and incremental.

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          Most cited references134

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          Benchmarking the incidence and mortality of severe sepsis in the United States.

          In 1992, the first consensus definition of severe sepsis was published. Subsequent epidemiologic estimates were collected using administrative data, but ongoing discrepancies in the definition of severe sepsis produced large differences in estimates. We seek to describe the variations in incidence and mortality of severe sepsis in the United States using four methods of database abstraction. We hypothesized that different methodologies of capturing cases of severe sepsis would result in disparate estimates of incidence and mortality. Using a nationally representative sample, four previously published methods (Angus et al, Martin et al, Dombrovskiy et al, and Wang et al) were used to gather cases of severe sepsis over a 6-year period (2004-2009). In addition, the use of new International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition (ICD-9), sepsis codes was compared with previous methods. Annual national incidence and in-hospital mortality of severe sepsis. The average annual incidence varied by as much as 3.5-fold depending on method used and ranged from 894,013 (300/100,000 population) to 3,110,630 (1,031/100,000) using the methods of Dombrovskiy et al and Wang et al, respectively. Average annual increase in the incidence of severe sepsis was similar (13.0% to 13.3%) across all methods. In-hospital mortality ranged from 14.7% to 29.9% using abstraction methods of Wang et al and Dombrovskiy et al. Using all methods, there was a decrease in in-hospital mortality across the 6-year period (35.2% to 25.6% [Dombrovskiy et al] and 17.8% to 12.1% [Wang et al]). Use of ICD-9 sepsis codes more than doubled over the 6-year period (158,722 - 489,632 [995.92 severe sepsis], 131,719 - 303,615 [785.52 septic shock]). There is substantial variability in incidence and mortality of severe sepsis depending on the method of database abstraction used. A uniform, consistent method is needed for use in national registries to facilitate accurate assessment of clinical interventions and outcome comparisons between hospitals and regions.
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            PAMP s and DAMP s: signal 0s that spur autophagy and immunity

            Summary Pathogen‐associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) are derived from microorganisms and recognized by pattern recognition receptor (PRR)‐bearing cells of the innate immune system as well as many epithelial cells. In contrast, damage‐associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) are cell‐derived and initiate and perpetuate immunity in response to trauma, ischemia, and tissue damage, either in the absence or presence of pathogenic infection. Most PAMPs and DAMPs serve as so‐called ‘Signal 0s’ that bind specific receptors [Toll‐like receptors, NOD‐like receptors, RIG‐I‐like receptors, AIM2‐like receptors, and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE)] to promote autophagy. Autophagy, a conserved lysosomal degradation pathway, is a cell survival mechanism invoked in response to environmental and cellular stress. Autophagy is inferred to have been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor and only to have been lost by some obligatory intracellular parasites. As such, autophagy represents a unifying biology, subserving survival and the earliest host defense strategies, predating apoptosis, within eukaryotes. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of autophagic molecular mechanisms and functions in emergent immunity.
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              Rapid increase in hospitalization and mortality rates for severe sepsis in the United States: a trend analysis from 1993 to 2003.

              To determine recent trends in rates of hospitalization, mortality, and hospital case fatality for severe sepsis in the United States. Trend analysis for the period from 1993 to 2003. U.S. community hospitals from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample that is a 20% stratified sample of all U.S. community hospitals. Subjects of any age with sepsis including severe sepsis who were hospitalized in the United States during the study period. None. Utilizing International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes for septicemia and major organ dysfunction, we identified 8,403,766 patients with sepsis, including 2,857,476 patients with severe sepsis, who were hospitalized in the United States from 1993 to 2003. The percentage of severe sepsis cases among all sepsis cases increased continuously from 25.6% in 1993 to 43.8% in 2003 (p < .001). Age-adjusted rate of hospitalization for severe sepsis grew from 66.8 +/- 0.16 to 132.0 +/- 0.21 per 100,000 population (p < .001). Age-adjusted, population-based mortality rate within these years increased from 30.3 +/- 0.11 to 49.7 +/- 0.13 per 100,000 population (p < .001), whereas hospital case fatality rate fell from 45.8% +/- 0.17% to 37.8% +/- 0.10% (p < .001). During each study year, the rates of hospitalization, mortality, and case fatality increased with age. Hospitalization and mortality rates in males exceeded those in females, but case fatality rate was greater in females. From 1993 to 2003, age-adjusted rates for severe sepsis hospitalization and mortality increased annually by 8.2% (p < .001) and 5.6% (p < .001), respectively, whereas case fatality rate decreased by 1.4% (p < .001). The rate of severe sepsis hospitalization almost doubled during the 11-yr period studied and is considerably greater than has been previously predicted. Mortality from severe sepsis also increased significantly. However, case fatality rates decreased during the same study period.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                101672103
                44978
                Nat Rev Dis Primers
                Nat Rev Dis Primers
                Nature reviews. Disease primers
                2056-676X
                12 June 2017
                30 June 2016
                30 June 2016
                01 August 2017
                : 2
                : 16045
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University of St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, USA
                [2 ]Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Shands Hospital, Room 6116, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0019, USA
                [3 ]Department of Infectious Diseases and Medicine, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
                [4 ]Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany
                [5 ]Department of Intensive Care, Erasme University Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium
                Author notes
                Correspondence to L.L.M. Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Shands Hospital, Room 6116, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0019, USA. moldawer@ 123456surgery.ufl.edu
                Article
                PMC5538252 PMC5538252 5538252 nihpa883730
                10.1038/nrdp.2016.45
                5538252
                28117397
                6e459479-52cd-46e5-84d2-ba09b8af1460
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