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      Important Therapeutic Uses of Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae): A Review

      Journal of Biological Sciences

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          Most cited references 29

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          Antimicrobial properties of phenolic compounds from berries.

          To investigate the antimicrobial properties of phenolic compounds present in Finnish berries against probiotic bacteria and other intestinal bacteria, including pathogenic species. Antimicrobial activity of pure phenolic compounds representing flavonoids and phenolic acids, and eight extracts from common Finnish berries, was measured against selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species, including probiotic bacteria and the intestinal pathogen Salmonella. Antimicrobial activity was screened by an agar diffusion method and bacterial growth was measured in liquid culture as a more accurate assay. Myricetin inhibited the growth of all lactic acid bacteria derived from the human gastrointestinal tract flora but it did not affect the Salmonella strain. In general, berry extracts inhibited the growth of Gram-negative but not Gram-positive bacteria. These variations may reflect differences in cell surface structures between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Cloudberry, raspberry and strawberry extracts were strong inhibitors of Salmonella. Sea buckthorn berry and blackcurrant showed the least activity against Gram-negative bacteria. Different bacterial species exhibit different sensitivities towards phenolics. These properties can be utilized in functional food development and in food preservative purposes.
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            Content of the flavonols quercetin, myricetin, and kaempferol in 25 edible berries.

            The amounts of quercetin, myricetin, and kaempferol aglycons in 25 edible berries were analyzed by an optimized RP-HPLC method with UV detection and identified with diode array and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry detection. Sixteen species of cultivated berries and nine species of wild berries were collected in Finland in 1997. Quercetin was found in all berries, the contents being highest in bog whortleberry (158 mg/kg, fresh weight), lingonberry (74 and 146 mg/kg), cranberry (83 and 121 mg/kg), chokeberry (89 mg/kg), sweet rowan (85 mg/kg), rowanberry (63 mg/kg), sea buckthorn berry (62 mg/kg), and crowberry (53 and 56 mg/kg). Amounts between 14 and 142 mg/kg of myricetin were detected in cranberry, black currant, crowberry, bog whortleberry, blueberries, and bilberry. Kaempferol was detected only in gooseberries (16 and 19 mg/kg) and strawberries (5 and 8 mg/kg). Total contents of these flavonols (100-263 mg/kg) in cranberry, bog whortleberry, lingonberry, black currant, and crowberry were higher than those in the commonly consumed fruits or vegetables, except for onion, kale, and broccoli.
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              [241 Total antioxidant status in plasma and body fluids

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Biological Sciences
                J. of Biological Sciences
                Science Alert
                17273048
                18125719
                May 1 2004
                May 1 2004
                : 4
                : 5
                : 687-693
                Article
                10.3923/jbs.2004.687.693
                © 2004

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