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      Spatio-Temporal Analysis of <I>Xyleborus glabratus</I> (Coleoptera: Circulionidae: Scolytinae) Invasion in Eastern U.S. Forests

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      Environmental Entomology
      Entomological Society of America

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          Abstract

          The non-native redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus Eichhoff (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), has recently emerged as a significant pest of southeastern U.S. coastal forests. Specifically, a fungal symbiont (Raffaelea sp.) of X. glabratus has caused mortality of redbay (Persea borbonia) and sassafras (Sassafras albidum) trees in the region; several other Lauraceae species also seem susceptible. Although the range of X. glabratus continues to expand rapidly, little is known about the species' biology and behavior. In turn, there has been no broad-scale assessment of the threat it poses to eastern U.S. forests. To provide a basic information framework, we performed analyses exploiting relevant spatio-temporal data available for X. glabratus. First, we mapped the densities of redbay and sassafras from forest inventory data. Second, we used climate matching to delineate potential geographic limits for X. glabratus. Third, we used county infestation data to estimate the rate of spread and modeled spread through time, incorporating host density as a weighting factor. Our results suggest that (1) key areas with high concentrations of redbay have yet to be invaded, but some are immediately threatened; (2) climatic conditions may serve to constrain X. glabratus to the southeastern U.S. coastal region; and (3) if unchecked, X. glabratus may spread throughout the range of redbay in <40 yr. Disruption of anthropogenic, long-distance dispersal could reduce the likelihood of this outcome.

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          The application of ‘least-cost’ modelling as a functional landscape model

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            Assessing the impacts of global warming on forest pest dynamics

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              Exotic bark- and wood-boring Coleoptera in the United States: recent establishments and interceptions

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Environmental Entomology
                en
                Entomological Society of America
                0046225X
                0046225X
                April 01 2008
                April 01 2008
                : 37
                : 2
                : 442-452
                Article
                10.1603/0046-225X(2008)37[442:SAOXGC]2.0.CO;2
                18419916
                6f607483-5124-41dd-ab81-001f530facca
                © 2008
                History

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