21
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Whales originated from aquatic artiodactyls in the Eocene epoch of India

      , , , ,
      Nature
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Although the first ten million years of whale evolution are documented by a remarkable series of fossil skeletons, the link to the ancestor of cetaceans has been missing. It was known that whales are related to even-toed ungulates (artiodactyls), but until now no artiodactyls were morphologically close to early whales. Here we show that the Eocene south Asian raoellid artiodactyls are the sister group to whales. The raoellid Indohyus is similar to whales, and unlike other artiodactyls, in the structure of its ears and premolars, in the density of its limb bones and in the stable-oxygen-isotope composition of its teeth. We also show that a major dietary change occurred during the transition from artiodactyls to whales and that raoellids were aquatic waders. This indicates that aquatic life in this lineage occurred before the origin of the order Cetacea.

          Related collections

          Most cited references34

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          The Effects of Sample Treatment and Diagenesis on the Isotopic Integrity of Carbonate in Biogenic Hydroxylapatite

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Predicting animal δ18O: Accounting for diet and physiological adaptation

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              A model of oxygen isotope fractionation in body water of large mammals

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature
                Nature
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0028-0836
                1476-4687
                December 2007
                December 2007
                : 450
                : 7173
                : 1190-1194
                Article
                10.1038/nature06343
                18097400
                6ffe08e5-586f-429a-b004-df203a701f10
                © 2007

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article