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      Universal primers for amplification of three non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA

      , , ,
      Plant Molecular Biology
      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Abstract

          Six primers for the amplification of three non-coding regions of chloroplast DNA via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been designed. In order to find out whether these primers were universal, we used them in an attempt to amplify DNA from various plant species. The primers worked for most species tested including algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms and angiosperms. The fact that they amplify chloroplast DNA non-coding regions over a wide taxonomic range means that these primers may be used to study the population biology (in supplying markers) and evolution (inter- and probably intraspecific phylogenies) of plants.

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          Most cited references11

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          Dynamics of mitochondrial DNA evolution in animals: amplification and sequencing with conserved primers.

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            Primer-directed enzymatic amplification of DNA with a thermostable DNA polymerase.

            A thermostable DNA polymerase was used in an in vitro DNA amplification procedure, the polymerase chain reaction. The enzyme, isolated from Thermus aquaticus, greatly simplifies the procedure and, by enabling the amplification reaction to be performed at higher temperatures, significantly improves the specificity, yield, sensitivity, and length of products that can be amplified. Single-copy genomic sequences were amplified by a factor of more than 10 million with very high specificity, and DNA segments up to 2000 base pairs were readily amplified. In addition, the method was used to amplify and detect a target DNA molecule present only once in a sample of 10(5) cells.
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              Chloroplast DNA Variation and Plant Phylogeny

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Plant Molecular Biology
                Plant Mol Biol
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0167-4412
                1573-5028
                November 1991
                November 1991
                : 17
                : 5
                : 1105-1109
                Article
                10.1007/BF00037152
                1932684
                70c4ff70-335e-43cf-9e8f-48423de20e0c
                © 1991

                http://www.springer.com/tdm


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