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      Comparison of the incidence and severity of cough induced by sufentanil and fentanyl: a prospective, randomised, double-blind study : Cough induced by sufentanil and fentanyl

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      Anaesthesia

      Wiley

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          Salbutamol, beclomethasone or sodium chromoglycate suppress coughing induced by iv fentanyl.

          Fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, is a popular choice amongst anesthesiologists in the operating room. Preinduction iv fentanyl bolus is associated with coughing in 28-45% of patients. Coughing due to fentanyl is not always benign and at times may be explosive requiring immediate intervention. We have studied the role of aerosol inhalation of salbutamol, beclomethasone and sodium chromoglycate in preventing fentanyl induced coughing and have compared their efficacy. Two hundred patients aged 18-60 yr, undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into four groups of 50 each. Group I served as control, while Groups II, III and IV received an aerosol inhalation of salbutamol, beclomethasone or sodium chromoglycate 15 min prior to entering the operating room. Following iv fentanyl (2 micro g x kg(-1)) the incidence of cough was recorded and graded as mild (1-2), moderate (3-5) and severe (> 5) depending on the number of coughs observed. Results were analyzed using 'z' and Fischer's Exact test. A P value of /= 0.05). The use of salbutamol, beclomethasone or sodium chromoglycate aerosol 15 min prior to iv fentanyl administration minimizes fentanyl-induced coughing.
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            Intravenous lidocaine 0.5 mg.kg-1 effectively suppresses fentanyl-induced cough.

            To evaluate the minimal dose of lidocaine required for suppression of fentanyl-induced cough. 320 ASA I and II patients, non-smokers of both sexes scheduled for elective surgery between the ages of 18 to 60 yr were randomly allocated into four equal groups. The patients were assigned to receive lidocaine 0.5 mg.kg(-1) (Group I), 1.0 mg.kg(-1)(Group II), 1.5 mg.kg(-1) (Group III) or placebo (Group IV) over five seconds, one minute prior to the administration of fentanyl 3 microg.kg(-1) in a randomized and double-blind fashion. Any episode of cough was classified as coughing and graded as mild (1-2) moderate (3-4) or severe (5 or more). The data were analyzed by test of proportion. Eleven, 12, 11 and 28 patients (13.75%, 15%, 13.75% and 35%) had cough in Groups I, II, III and IV respectively (P 0.05). The results of our study suggest that iv lidocaine 0.5 mg.kg(-1) is the minimal dose required to suppress fentanyl-induced cough when administered one minute prior to fentanyl. Any further increase in the lidocaine dose does not reduce the incidence or severity of fentanyl-induced cough.
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              Tussive effect of a fentanyl bolus.

              The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of pre-induction coughing, after an iv bolus of fentanyl. The study sample was 250 ASA physical status I-II patients, scheduled for various elective surgical procedures. The first 100 were randomly allocated to receive 1.5 micrograms.kg-1 fentanyl via a peripheral venous cannula (Group 1), or an equivalent volume of saline (Group 2). Twenty-eight per cent of patients who received fentanyl, but none given saline, coughed within one minute (P less than 0.0001). The second 150 patients were then randomly assigned to three equal pretreatment groups. Group 3 received 0.01 mg.kg-1 atropine iv one minute before fentanyl. Groups 4 and 5 received 0.2 mg.kg-1 morphine im, and 7.5 mg midazolam po, respectively, one hour before fentanyl. Thirty per cent of patients in Group 3, 6% in Group 4, and 40% in Group 5, had a cough response to fentanyl. Fentanyl, when given through a peripheral cannula, provoked cough in a considerable proportion of patients. This was not altered by premedication with atropine or midazolam, but was reduced after morphine (P less than 0.01). Coughing upon induction of anaesthesia is undesirable in some patients, and stimulation of cough by fentanyl in unpremedicated patients may be of clinical importance.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Anaesthesia
                Wiley
                00032409
                13652044
                December 2007
                November 05 2007
                : 62
                : 12
                : 1230-1232
                Article
                10.1111/j.1365-2044.2007.05249.x
                © 2007

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