19
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Dietary intake of trans fatty acids and systemic inflammation in women

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          trans Fatty acid (TFA) intake predicts risks of coronary artery disease and diabetes. Systemic inflammation may be involved in the pathogenesis of such conditions; however, relations between TFA intake and systemic inflammation are not well established. We investigated the relations between TFA intake and inflammatory markers. In 823 generally healthy women in the Nurses' Health Study I and II, concentrations of soluble tumor necrosis factor alpha receptors 1 and 2 (sTNF-R1, sTNF-R2), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Usual dietary intakes assessed from 2 semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaires were averaged for each subject. In age-adjusted analyses, TFA intake was positively associated with sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 (P for trend < 0.001 for each): sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 concentrations were 10% (+108 pg/mL; 95% CI: 50, 167 pg/mL) and 12% (+258 pg/mL; 138, 377 pg/mL) higher, respectively, in the highest intake quintile than in the lowest. These associations were not appreciably altered by adjustment for body mass index, smoking, physical activity, aspirin and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use, alcohol consumption, and intakes of saturated fat, protein, n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, fiber, and total energy. Adjustment for serum lipid concentrations partly attenuated these associations, which suggests that they may be partly mediated by effects of TFAs on serum lipids. TFA intake was not associated with IL-6 or CRP concentrations overall but was positively associated with IL-6 and CRP in women with higher body mass index (P for interaction = 0.03 for each). TFA intake is positively associated with markers of systemic inflammation in women. Further investigation of the influences of TFAs on inflammation and of implications for coronary disease, diabetes, and other conditions is warranted.

          Related collections

          Most cited references42

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Dietary fat intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

          The long-term relations between specific types of dietary fat and risk of type 2 diabetes remain unclear. Our objective was to examine the relations between dietary fat intakes and the risk of type 2 diabetes. We prospectively followed 84204 women aged 34-59 y with no diabetes, cardiovascular disease, or cancer in 1980. Detailed dietary information was assessed at baseline and updated in 1984, 1986, and 1990 by using validated questionnaires. Relative risks of type 2 diabetes were obtained from pooled logistic models adjusted for nondietary and dietary covariates. During 14 y of follow-up, 2507 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were documented. Total fat intake, compared with equivalent energy intake from carbohydrates, was not associated with risk of type 2 diabetes; for a 5% increase in total energy from fat, the relative risk (RR) was 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02). Intakes of saturated or monounsaturated fatty acids were also not significantly associated with the risk of diabetes. However, for a 5% increase in energy from polyunsaturated fat, the RR was 0.63 (0.53, 0.76; P < 0.0001) and for a 2% increase in energy from trans fatty acids the RR was 1.39 (1.15, 1.67; P = 0.0006). We estimated that replacing 2% of energy from trans fatty acids isoenergetically with polyunsaturated fat would lead to a 40% lower risk (RR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.75). These data suggest that total fat and saturated and monounsaturated fatty acid intakes are not associated with risk of type 2 diabetes in women, but that trans fatty acids increase and polyunsaturated fatty acids reduce risk. Substituting nonhydrogenated polyunsaturated fatty acids for trans fatty acids would likely reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes substantially.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Plasma cytokine parameters and mortality in patients with chronic heart failure.

            Inflammatory immune activation is an important feature in chronic heart failure (CHF). Little is known about the prognostic importance of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF-receptor 1 and 2 (sTNF-R1/sTNF-R2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble CD14 receptors (sCD14) in CHF patients. In 152 CHF patients (age 61+/-1 years, New York Heart Association [NYHA] class 2.6+/-0.1, peak VO(2) 17.3+/-0.6 mL. kg(-1). min(-1), mean+/-SEM) plasma concentrations of immune variables were prospectively assessed. During a mean follow-up of 34 months (>12 months in all patients), 62 patients (41%) died. Cumulative mortality was 28% at 24 months. In univariate analyses, increased total and trimeric TNF-alpha, sTNF-R1, and sTNF-R2 (all P
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Habitual dietary intake of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in relation to inflammatory markers among US men and women.

              Polyunsaturated fatty acid intake favorably affects chronic inflammatory-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease; however, high intake of n-6 fatty acids may attenuate the known beneficial effects of n-3 fatty acids. We investigated habitual dietary n-3 fatty acid intake and its interaction with n-6 fatty acids in relation to the plasma inflammatory markers C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, and soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 (sTNF-R1 and R2) among 405 healthy men and 454 healthy women. After adjustment for other predictors of inflammation, intake of the n-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was inversely associated with plasma levels of sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2 (P=0.03 and P<0.001, respectively) and somewhat less so for C-reactive protein (P=0.08). n-3 alpha-linolenic acid and n-6 cis-linoleic acid were not significantly related to the inflammatory markers. We found little if any association between n-3 fatty acid (EPA+DHA) intake and tumor necrosis factor receptors among participants with low intake of n-6 but a strong inverse association among those with high n-6 intake (P=0.04 and 0.002 for interaction of n-3 with n-6 on sTNF-R1 and sTNF-R2, respectively). These results suggest that n-6 fatty acids do not inhibit the antiinflammatory effects of n-3 fatty acids and that the combination of both types of fatty acids is associated with the lowest levels of inflammation. The inhibition of inflammatory cytokines may be one possible mechanism for the observed beneficial effects of these fatty acids on chronic inflammatory-related diseases.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                0002-9165
                1938-3207
                April 2004
                April 01 2004
                April 2004
                April 01 2004
                : 79
                : 4
                : 606-612
                Article
                10.1093/ajcn/79.4.606
                1282449
                15051604
                71275813-f764-453c-88f1-980c254c0781
                © 2004
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article