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Membrane Mechanics of Endocytosis in Cells with Turgor

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      Abstract

      Endocytosis is an essential process by which cells internalize a piece of plasma membrane and material from the outside. In cells with turgor, pressure opposes membrane defor- mations, and increases the amount of force that has to be generated by the endocytic machinery. To determine this force, and calculate the shape of the membrane, we used physical theory to model an elastic surface under pressure. Accurate fits of experimental profiles are obtained assuming that the coated membrane is highly rigid and preferentially curved at the endocytic site. The forces required from the actin machinery peaks at the onset of deformation, indicating that once invagination has been initiated, endocytosis is unlikely to stall before completion. Coat proteins do not lower the initiation force but may affect the process by the curvature they induce. In the presence of isotropic curvature inducers, pulling the tip of the invagination can trigger the formation of a neck at the base of the invagination. Hence direct neck constriction by actin may not be required, while its pulling role is essential. Finally, the theory shows that anisotropic curvature effectors stabilize membrane invaginations, and the loss of crescent-shaped BAR domain proteins such as Rvs167 could therefore trigger membrane scission.

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      Most cited references 42

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      Molecular mechanism and physiological functions of clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

      Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is the endocytic portal into cells through which cargo is packaged into vesicles with the aid of a clathrin coat. It is fundamental to neurotransmission, signal transduction and the regulation of many plasma membrane activities and is thus essential to higher eukaryotic life. Morphological stages of vesicle formation are mirrored by progression through various protein modules (complexes). The process involves the formation of a putative FCH domain only (FCHO) initiation complex, which matures through adaptor protein 2 (AP2)-dependent cargo selection, and subsequent coat building, dynamin-mediated scission and finally auxilin- and heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70)-dependent uncoating. Some modules can be used in other pathways, and additions or substitutions confer cell specificity and adaptability.
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        Membrane curvature and mechanisms of dynamic cell membrane remodelling.

        Membrane curvature is no longer seen as a passive consequence of cellular activity but an active means to create membrane domains and to organize centres for membrane trafficking. Curvature can be dynamically modulated by changes in lipid composition, the oligomerization of curvature scaffolding proteins and the reversible insertion of protein regions that act like wedges in membranes. There is an interplay between curvature-generating and curvature-sensing proteins during vesicle budding. This is seen during vesicle budding and in the formation of microenvironments. On a larger scale, membrane curvature is a prime player in growth, division and movement.
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          BAR domains as sensors of membrane curvature: the amphiphysin BAR structure.

          The BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain is the most conserved feature in amphiphysins from yeast to human and is also found in endophilins and nadrins. We solved the structure of the Drosophila amphiphysin BAR domain. It is a crescent-shaped dimer that binds preferentially to highly curved negatively charged membranes. With its N-terminal amphipathic helix and BAR domain (N-BAR), amphiphysin can drive membrane curvature in vitro and in vivo. The structure is similar to that of arfaptin2, which we find also binds and tubulates membranes. From this, we predict that BAR domains are in many protein families, including sorting nexins, centaurins, and oligophrenins. The universal and minimal BAR domain is a dimerization, membrane-binding, and curvature-sensing module.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            1509.00698
            10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004538

            Cell biology, Biophysics

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