21
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Declassifying Myrmecophily in the Coleoptera to Promote the Study of Ant-Beetle Symbioses

      Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
      Hindawi Limited

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The symbiotic associations between beetles and ants have been observed in at least 35 beetle families. Among myrmecophiles, beetles exhibit the most diverse behavioral and morphological adaptations to a life with ants. These various associations have historically been grouped into discrete but overlapping behavioral categories, many of which are still used in the modern literature. While these behavioral classifications provide a rich foundation for the study of ant-beetle symbioses, the application of these systems in future studies may be less than effective. Since morphological characteristics often provide the only information of myrmecophilous beetles, they should be studied in a species-by-species fashion, as behavioral data are often limited or unavailable. Similarly, behavioral studies should focus on the target species at hand, avoiding discrete classification schemes. I formally propose the rejection of any classification scheme, in order to promote future studies of myrmecophily in both taxonomic and evolutionary studies.

          Related collections

          Most cited references20

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Ecological, behavioral, and biochemical aspects of insect hydrocarbons.

          This review covers selected literature from 1982 to the present on some of the ecological, behavioral, and biochemical aspects of hydrocarbon use by insects and other arthropods. Major ecological and behavioral topics are species- and gender-recognition, nestmate recognition, task-specific cues, dominance and fertility cues, chemical mimicry, and primer pheromones. Major biochemical topics include chain length regulation, mechanism of hydrocarbon formation, timing of hydrocarbon synthesis and transport, and biosynthesis of volatile hydrocarbon pheromones of Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. In addition, a section is devoted to future research needs in this rapidly growing area of science.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            The ecology and evolution of ant association in the Lycaenidae (Lepidoptera).

            The estimated 6000 species of Lycaenidae account for about one third of all Papilionoidea. The majority of lycaenids have associations with ants that can be facultative or obligate and range from mutualism to parasitism. Lycaenid larvae and pupae employ complex chemical and acoustical signals to manipulate ants. Cost/benefit analyses have demonstrated multiple trade-offs involved in myrmecophily. Both demographic and phylogenetic evidence indicate that ant association has shaped the evolution of obligately associated groups. Parasitism typically arises from mutualism with ants, and entomophagous species are disproportionately common in the Lycaenidae compared with other Lepidoptera. Obligate associations are more common in the Southern Hemisphere, in part because highly ant-associated lineages make up a larger proportion of the fauna in these regions. Further research on phylogeny and natural history, particularly of the Neotropical fauna, will be necessary to understand the role ant association has played in the evolution of the Lycaenidae.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The largest animal association centered on one species: the army ant Eciton burchellii and its more than 300 associates

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
                Psyche: A Journal of Entomology
                Hindawi Limited
                0033-2615
                1687-7438
                2013
                2013
                : 2013
                :
                : 1-8
                Article
                10.1155/2013/696401
                7161d6c7-a3d4-4a9b-afbe-6921736650d2
                © 2013

                http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article