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      Outcome of Pregnancy in a Patient with Gitelman Syndrome: A Case Report

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      Nephron Physiology

      S. Karger AG

      Gitelman syndrome, Pregnancy, Hypokalaemia

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          Abstract

          Gitelman syndrome (GS) is an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia and hypocalciuria. Though it affects women of child-bearing age very little information is available about its impact on maternal and fetal outcome. We describe the course of pregnancy in a patient with GS which was characterized by a sixfold increase in potassium and magnesium requirements with inability to achieve normal levels despite intravenous supplementation. There was no adverse impact on the course of pregnancy or fetal outcome. The case highlights the variability in the phenotypic presentation of GS and recommends frequent monitoring of electrolytes with supplementation guided by clinical requirements without aiming to achieve normal blood levels.

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          Most cited references 5

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          Novel mutations in the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter gene in patients with Gitelman syndrome with predominant localization to the C-terminal domain.

          Gitelman syndrome (familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia syndrome) is an autosomal recessive inherited renal disorder characterized by defective tubular reabsorption of magnesium and potassium. In this study a group of 18 unrelated and 2 related Gitelman patients, collected from six different countries have been screened for mutations in the human thiazide-sensitive sodium-chloride cotransporter (SLC12A3) gene. Fourteen novel SLC12A3 mutations are presented along with six mutations described earlier, and three neutral polymorphisms. Among the tested patients are two who carry a total of three heterozygous SLC12A3 mutations. Two-thirds of the total number of mutant SLC12A3 alleles are amino acid substitutions. Most SLC12A3 gene mutations, 14 out of a total of 20, are localized at the intracellular carboxy-terminal domain of the NCCT protein. The pathogenicity of individual SLC12A3 mutations is based upon their predicted effect on SLC12A3 protein, and segregation in family members. Evolutionary conservation of substituted amino acid residues and their frequency in control chromosomes is presented. Identical mutations have been found in Gitelman families from different geographical origin, suggesting ancient mutations originating from a common ancestor. As yet, we have not found any evidence for a possible genotype-phenotype correlation.
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            Renal hemodynamics and tubular function in normal human pregnancy

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              Maternal plasma concentrations of magnesium, calcium, zinc and copper in normal and pathological pregnancies

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                NEP
                Nephron Physiol
                10.1159/issn.1660-2137
                Nephron Physiology
                S. Karger AG
                1660-2137
                2005
                October 2005
                02 September 2005
                : 101
                : 2
                : p35-p38
                Affiliations
                Department of Nephrology, The Canberra Hospital, Canberra, Australia
                Article
                86418 Nephron Physiol 2005;101:p35–p38
                10.1159/000086418
                15976513
                © 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 2, Tables: 1, References: 11, Pages: 1
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/86418
                Categories
                Short Report

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

                Hypokalaemia, Pregnancy, Gitelman syndrome

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