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      Therapy of Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer With an SN-38-Anti-Trop-2 Drug Conjugate, Sacituzumab Govitecan

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          Abstract

          Purpose

          Trop-2, expressed in most solid cancers, may be a target for antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We studied sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132), a Trop-2 ADC, for the targeting of SN-38.

          Patients and Methods

          We evaluated IMMU-132 in a single-arm multicenter trial in patients with pretreated metastatic NSCLC who received either 8 or 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 of 21-day cycles. The primary end points were safety and objective response rate (ORR). Progression-free survival and overall survival were secondary end points.

          Results

          Fifty-four patients were treated. In the response-assessable study population (n = 47), which had a median of three prior therapies (range, two to seven), the ORR was 19%; median response duration, 6.0 months (95% CI, 4.8 to 8.3 months); and clinical benefit rate (complete response + partial response + stable disease ≥ 4 months), 43%. ORR in the intention-to-treat (ITT) population was 17% (nine of 54). Responses occurred with a median onset of 3.8 months, including patients who had relapsed or progressed after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Median ITT progression-free survival was 5.2 months (95% CI, 3.2 to 7.1 months) and median ITT overall survival, 9.5 months (95% CI, 5.9 to 16.7 months). Grade 3 or higher adverse events included neutropenia (28%), diarrhea (7%), nausea (7%), fatigue (6%), and febrile neutropenia (4%). One patient developed a transient immune response, despite patients receiving a median of 10 doses. More than 90% of 26 assessable archival tumor specimens were highly positive (2+, 3+) for Trop-2 by immunohistochemistry, which suggests that Trop-2 is not a predictive biomarker for response.

          Conclusion

          IMMU-132 was well-tolerated and induced durable responses in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic NSCLC. This ADC should be studied further in this disease and in other patients with Trop-2–expressing tumors.

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          Most cited references 26

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          New response evaluation criteria in solid tumours: revised RECIST guideline (version 1.1).

          Assessment of the change in tumour burden is an important feature of the clinical evaluation of cancer therapeutics: both tumour shrinkage (objective response) and disease progression are useful endpoints in clinical trials. Since RECIST was published in 2000, many investigators, cooperative groups, industry and government authorities have adopted these criteria in the assessment of treatment outcomes. However, a number of questions and issues have arisen which have led to the development of a revised RECIST guideline (version 1.1). Evidence for changes, summarised in separate papers in this special issue, has come from assessment of a large data warehouse (>6500 patients), simulation studies and literature reviews. HIGHLIGHTS OF REVISED RECIST 1.1: Major changes include: Number of lesions to be assessed: based on evidence from numerous trial databases merged into a data warehouse for analysis purposes, the number of lesions required to assess tumour burden for response determination has been reduced from a maximum of 10 to a maximum of five total (and from five to two per organ, maximum). Assessment of pathological lymph nodes is now incorporated: nodes with a short axis of 15 mm are considered measurable and assessable as target lesions. The short axis measurement should be included in the sum of lesions in calculation of tumour response. Nodes that shrink to <10mm short axis are considered normal. Confirmation of response is required for trials with response primary endpoint but is no longer required in randomised studies since the control arm serves as appropriate means of interpretation of data. Disease progression is clarified in several aspects: in addition to the previous definition of progression in target disease of 20% increase in sum, a 5mm absolute increase is now required as well to guard against over calling PD when the total sum is very small. Furthermore, there is guidance offered on what constitutes 'unequivocal progression' of non-measurable/non-target disease, a source of confusion in the original RECIST guideline. Finally, a section on detection of new lesions, including the interpretation of FDG-PET scan assessment is included. Imaging guidance: the revised RECIST includes a new imaging appendix with updated recommendations on the optimal anatomical assessment of lesions. A key question considered by the RECIST Working Group in developing RECIST 1.1 was whether it was appropriate to move from anatomic unidimensional assessment of tumour burden to either volumetric anatomical assessment or to functional assessment with PET or MRI. It was concluded that, at present, there is not sufficient standardisation or evidence to abandon anatomical assessment of tumour burden. The only exception to this is in the use of FDG-PET imaging as an adjunct to determination of progression. As is detailed in the final paper in this special issue, the use of these promising newer approaches requires appropriate clinical validation studies.
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            Pembrolizumab versus Chemotherapy for PD-L1–Positive Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

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              Non-small cell lung cancer: current treatment and future advances.

              Lung cancer has a poor prognosis; over half of people diagnosed with lung cancer die within one year of diagnosis and the 5-year survival is less than 18%. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Risk factors for developing NSCLC have been identified, with cigarette smoking being a major factor along with other environmental and genetic risk factors. Depending on the staging of lung cancer, patients are eligible for certain treatments ranging from surgery to radiation to chemotherapy as well as targeted therapy. With the advancement of genetics and biomarkers testing, specific mutations have been identified to better target treatment for individual patients. This review discusses current treatments including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and immunotherapy as well as how biomarker testing has helped improve survival in patients with NSCLC.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Clinical Oncology
                JCO
                American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)
                0732-183X
                1527-7755
                August 20 2017
                August 20 2017
                : 35
                : 24
                : 2790-2797
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Rebecca Suk Heist and Aditya Bardia, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Rebecca Suk Heist and Aditya Bardia, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; Michael J. Guarino and Gregory Masters, Helen F. Graham Cancer Center & Research Institute, Newark, DE; W. Thomas Purcell, Wells A. Messersmith, and D. Ross Camidge, University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; Alexander N. Starodub, Indiana University Health Center for Cancer Care, Goshen, IN; Leora Horn and Jordan Berlin, Vanderbilt-Ingram...
                Article
                10.1200/JCO.2016.72.1894
                28548889
                © 2017
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