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      Larval Development and Complemental Males in Chelonibia Testudinaria, a Barnacle Commensal with Sea Turtles

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      Journal of Crustacean Biology

      Crustacean Society

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          What was natural in the coastal oceans?

           V Jackson (2001)
          Humans transformed Western Atlantic coastal marine ecosystems before modern ecological investigations began. Paleoecological, archeological, and historical reconstructions demonstrate incredible losses of large vertebrates and oysters from the entire Atlantic coast. Untold millions of large fishes, sharks, sea turtles, and manatees were removed from the Caribbean in the 17th to 19th centuries. Recent collapses of reef corals and seagrasses are due ultimately to losses of these large consumers as much as to more recent changes in climate, eutrophication, or outbreaks of disease. Overfishing in the 19th century reduced vast beds of oysters in Chesapeake Bay and other estuaries to a few percent of pristine abundances and promoted eutrophication. Mechanized harvesting of bottom fishes like cod set off a series of trophic cascades that eliminated kelp forests and then brought them back again as fishers fished their way down food webs to small invertebrates. Lastly, but most pervasively, mechanized harvesting of the entire continental shelf decimated large, long-lived fishes and destroyed three-dimensional habitats built up by sessile corals, bryozoans, and sponges. The universal pattern of losses demonstrates that no coastal ecosystem is pristine and few wild fisheries are sustainable along the entire Western Atlantic coast. Reconstructions of ecosystems lost only a century or two ago demonstrate attainable goals of establishing large and effective marine reserves if society is willing to pay the costs. Historical reconstructions provide a new scientific framework for manipulative experiments at the ecosystem scale to explore the feasibility and benefits of protection of our living coastal resources.
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            The sessile barnacles (Cirripedia) contained in the collections of the U. S. National Museum; including a monograph of the American species

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              Natural Chemical Cues for Settlement and Metamorphosis of Marine-Invertebrate Larvae

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Crustacean Biology
                Crustacean Society
                0278-0372
                1937-240X
                January 01 2004
                January 01 2004
                : 24
                : 3
                : 409-421
                Article
                10.1651/C-2476
                © 2004

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