83
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    1
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Poverty, social inequality and mental health

      ,
      Advances in Psychiatric Treatment
      Royal College of Psychiatrists

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The World Health Organization has described poverty as the greatest cause of suffering on earth. This article considers the direct and indirect effects of relative poverty on the development of emotional, behavioural and psychiatric problems, in the context of the growing inequality between rich and poor. The problems of children in particular are reviewed. Targets to reduce inequality have been set both nationally and internationally.

          Related collections

          Most cited references27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          Social class and mental illness: Community study.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Book: not found

            Unhealthy Societies

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Socioeconomic status and psychiatric disorders: the causation-selection issue.

              Are inverse relations between psychiatric disorders and socioeconomic status due more to social causation (adversity and stress) or social selection (downward mobility of genetically predisposed)? This classical epidemiological issue is tested by focusing on ethnic status in relation to socioeconomic status. Ethnic status cannot be an effect of disorder because it is present at birth whereas socioeconomic status depends on educational and occupational attainment. A birth cohort sample of 4914 young, Israel-born adults of European and North African background was selected from the country's population register, screened, and diagnosed by psychiatrists. Results indicate that social selection may be more important for schizophrenia and that social causation may be more important for depression in women and for antisocial personality and substance use disorders in men.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advances in Psychiatric Treatment
                Adv. psychiatr. treat
                Royal College of Psychiatrists
                1355-5146
                1472-1481
                May 2004
                January 02 2018
                May 2004
                : 10
                : 3
                : 216-224
                Article
                10.1192/apt.10.3.216
                35217319
                722bfa0e-7927-4e23-b208-c209a17f33b9
                © 2004

                https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms

                History

                Social policy & Welfare,Medicine,Biochemistry,Ecology,Environmental studies,Life sciences

                Comments

                Comment on this article