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      Family obligation and the transition to young adulthood.

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      Developmental Psychology

      American Psychological Association (APA)

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          Abstract

          Changes in a sense of obligation to assist, support, and respect the family were examined among an ethnically diverse group of 745 American individuals as they began to move from secondary school into young adulthood. A sense of family obligation increased for all young adults, with slight variations according to ethnic and financial backgrounds. Young adults from Filipino and Latin American families reported the strongest sense of familial duty during young adulthood, which partially explained their tendency to live with and contribute financially to their families. The implications of family obligation for employment and educational persistence depended on age and academic performance in high school. Finally, a sense of family obligation was associated with more positive emotional well-being.

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          Most cited references 8

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          Pathways to Adulthood in Changing Societies: Variability and Mechanisms in Life Course Perspective

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            Individuation in Family Relationships

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              How children and adolescents spend time across the world: work, play, and developmental opportunities.

              The authors review studies on time use of children and adolescents around the world and discuss developmental implications of population differences. Industrialization and schooling are linked to dramatic declines in time spent on household and wage labor. This labor is often unchallenging, sometimes hazardous; developmental benefits often do not increase above a limited number of hours; hence, reduction in these activities opens time for activities that may be more developmentally beneficial. Adolescents in East Asian postindustrial societies spend this freed-up time in schoolwork, a use associated with lower intrinsic motivation but high achievement and economic productivity. Adolescents in North America spend more time in leisure, associated with greater self-direction but of an uncertain relation to development. Age, gender, and socioeconomic differences in activities and with whom time is spent are also considered.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Developmental Psychology
                Developmental Psychology
                American Psychological Association (APA)
                1939-0599
                0012-1649
                2002
                2002
                : 38
                : 5
                : 856-868
                Article
                10.1037/0012-1649.38.5.856
                12220060
                © 2002

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