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      Malnutrition as an enteric infectious disease with long-term effects on child development.

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          Abstract

          Malnutrition is a major contributor to mortality and is increasingly recognized as a cause of potentially lifelong functional disability. Yet, a rate-limiting step in achieving normal nutrition may be impaired absorptive function due to multiple repeated enteric infections. This is especially problematic in children whose diets are marginal. In malnourished individuals, the infections are even more devastating. This review documents the evidence that intestinal infections lead to malnutrition and that malnutrition worsens intestinal infections. The clinical data presented here derive largely from long-term cohort studies that are supported by controlled animal studies. Also reviewed are the mechanisms by which enteric infections lead to undernutrition and by which malnutrition worsens enteric infections, with implications for potential novel interventions. Further intervention studies are needed to document the relevance of these mechanisms and, most importantly, to interrupt the vicious diarrhea-malnutrition cycle so children may develop their full potential.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nutr Rev
          Nutrition reviews
          Wiley
          1753-4887
          0029-6643
          Sep 2008
          : 66
          : 9
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Medicine, University of Virginia, Charlottesville 22901, USA. guerrant@virginia.edu
          Article
          NURE082 NIHMS65772
          10.1111/j.1753-4887.2008.00082.x
          2562291
          18752473
          726b98d6-b1bb-4aa2-b88e-6b6994be9c4e
          History

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