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      Law Enforcement Officers' Involvement Level in Hurricane Katrina and Alcohol Use.

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          Abstract

          The purpose of this work is to examine the relationship between alcohol use and level of involvement during Hurricane Katrina among law enforcement officers, and to investigate whether marital status or previous military training offer resilience against negative outcomes. Officers in the immediate New Orleans geographic area completed surveys that assessed their involvement in Hurricane Katrina and alcohol use (Alcohol Use and Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) score). Negative binomial regression models were used to analyze level of hazardous alcohol use; interactions were tested to examine protective influences of marriage and prior military training (controlling for age and gender). There was a significant association between heavy involvement in Hurricane Katrina and having a greater AUDIT score (exp(β)[EB]=1.81; 95% CI: 1.03, 3.17; p<0.05), indicating higher levels of hazardous alcohol use. Contrary to original hypotheses, marital status and military training were not protective against alcohol use (p>0.05). These results illustrate an association between law enforcement officers' heavy involvement during Hurricane Katrina and greater levels of hazardous alcohol use when compared to officers with low or moderate involvement. This has important treatment implications for those with high involvement in disasters as they may require targeted interventions to overcome the stress of such experiences.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Int J Emerg Ment Health
          International journal of emergency mental health
          OMICS Publishing Group
          1522-4821
          1522-4821
          Mar 2015
          : 17
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Community Health and Health Behavior, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York.
          [2 ] Biostatistics and Epidemiology Branch, Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
          [3 ] Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York.
          Article
          NIHMS744154
          10.4172/1522-4821.1000157
          4682870
          26688672
          72b6ccf9-e030-44c3-b48e-f747ef966b30
          History

          Hurricane Katrina,natural disaster,Alcohol consumption,first responders,law enforcement

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