3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Perspectives on Current and Novel Treatments for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

      1 , , 2

      Gut and Liver

      Editorial Office of Gut and Liver

      Inflammatory bowel diseases, Crohn disease, Colitis, ulcerative, Therapy

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          New therapeutic strategies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have shifted from symptom control towards treat-to-targ et algorithms in order to optimize treatment results. The treatment of IBD has evolved with the development of tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors beyond the conventional therapies. In spite of their long-term effectiveness, many patients do not respond to or cannot sustain treatment with these drugs, which have various side effects. Therefore, the development of new drugs targeting specific pathways in the pathogenesis of IBD has become necessary. Some novel biologics and small molecule drugs have shown potential in IBD clinical trials, providing safe and effective results. In addition, clinicians are now trying to target the dysbiotic microbiome of patients with IBD using fecal microbiota transplantation. New tools such as stem cells have also been developed. The available therapeutic options for IBD are expanding rapidly. In the next few years, physicians will face an unprecedented number of options when choosing the best treatments for patients with IBD. This review provides an overview of recent advances in IBD treatment options.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 78

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Infliximab for induction and maintenance therapy for ulcerative colitis.

          Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumor necrosis factor alpha, is an established treatment for Crohn's disease but not ulcerative colitis. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies--the Active Ulcerative Colitis Trials 1 and 2 (ACT 1 and ACT 2, respectively)--evaluated the efficacy of infliximab for induction and maintenance therapy in adults with ulcerative colitis. In each study, 364 patients with moderate-to-severe active ulcerative colitis despite treatment with concurrent medications received placebo or infliximab (5 mg or 10 mg per kilogram of body weight) intravenously at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and then every eight weeks through week 46 (in ACT 1) or week 22 (in ACT 2). Patients were followed for 54 weeks in ACT 1 and 30 weeks in ACT 2. In ACT 1, 69 percent of patients who received 5 mg of infliximab and 61 percent of those who received 10 mg had a clinical response at week 8, as compared with 37 percent of those who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). A response was defined as a decrease in the Mayo score of at least 3 points and at least 30 percent, with an accompanying decrease in the subscore for rectal bleeding of at least 1 point or an absolute rectal-bleeding subscore of 0 or 1. In ACT 2, 64 percent of patients who received 5 mg of infliximab and 69 percent of those who received 10 mg had a clinical response at week 8, as compared with 29 percent of those who received placebo (P<0.001 for both comparisons with placebo). In both studies, patients who received infliximab were more likely to have a clinical response at week 30 (P< or =0.002 for all comparisons). In ACT 1, more patients who received 5 mg or 10 mg of infliximab had a clinical response at week 54 (45 percent and 44 percent, respectively) than did those who received placebo (20 percent, P<0.001 for both comparisons). Patients with moderate-to-severe active ulcerative colitis treated with infliximab at weeks 0, 2, and 6 and every eight weeks thereafter were more likely to have a clinical response at weeks 8, 30, and 54 than were those receiving placebo. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00036439 and NCT00096655.) Copyright 2005 Massachusetts Medical Society.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A short-term study of chimeric monoclonal antibody cA2 to tumor necrosis factor alpha for Crohn's disease. Crohn's Disease cA2 Study Group.

            Studies in animals and an open-label trial have suggested a role for antibodies to tumor necrosis factor alpha, specifically chimeric monoclonal antibody cA2, in the treatment of Crohn's disease. We conducted a 12-week multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of cA2 in 108 patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease that was resistant to treatment. All had scores on the Crohn's Disease Activity Index between 220 and 400 (scores can range from 0 to about 600, with higher scores indicating more severe illness). Patients were randomly assigned to receive a single two-hour intravenous infusion of either placebo or cA2 in a dose of 5 mg per kilogram of body weight, 10 mg per kilogram, or 20 mg per kilogram. Clinical response, the primary end point, was defined as a reduction of 70 or more points in the score on the Crohn's Disease Activity Index at four weeks that was not accompanied by a change in any concomitant medications. At four weeks, 81 percent of the patients given 5 mg of cA2 per kilogram (22 of 27 patients), 50 percent of those given 10 mg of cA2 per kilogram (14 of 28), and 64 percent of those given 20 mg of cA2 per kilogram (18 of 28) had had a clinical response, as compared with 17 percent of patients in the placebo group (4 of 24) (p<0.001 for the comparison of the cA2 group as a whole with placebo). Thirty-three percent of the patients given cA2 went into remission (defined as a score below 150 on the Crohn's Disease Activity Index), as compared with 4 percent of the patients given placebo (P=0.005). At 12 weeks, 41 percent of the cA2-treated patients (34 of 83) had had a clinical response, as compared with 12 percent of the patients in the placebo group (3 of 25) (P=0.008). The rates of adverse effects were similar in the groups. A single infusion of cA2 was an effective short-term treatment in many patients with moderate-to-severe, treatment-resistant Crohn's disease.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Human anti-tumor necrosis factor monoclonal antibody (adalimumab) in Crohn's disease: the CLASSIC-I trial.

              Tumor necrosis factor blockade has been shown to be an effective treatment strategy in Crohn's disease (CD). Adalimumab is a human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG(1)) monoclonal antibody targeting tumor necrosis factor (TNF). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of adalimumab induction therapy in patients with CD. A total of 299 patients with moderate to severe CD naive to anti-TNF therapy were randomized to receive subcutaneous injections at weeks 0 and 2 with adalimumab 40 mg/20 mg, 80 mg/40 mg, or 160 mg/80 mg or placebo. The primary endpoint was demonstration of a significant difference in the rates of remission at week 4 (defined as a Crohn's Disease Activity Index score <150 points) among the 80 mg/40 mg, 160 mg/80 mg, and placebo groups. The rates of remission at week 4 in the adalimumab 40 mg/20 mg, 80 mg/40 mg, and 160 mg/80 mg groups were 18% (P = .36), 24% (P = .06), and 36% (P = .001), respectively, and 12% in the placebo group. Adverse events occurred at similar frequencies in all 4 treatment groups except injection site reactions, which were more common in adalimumab-treated patients. Adalimumab was superior to placebo for induction of remission in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's disease naive to anti-TNF therapy. The optimal induction dosing regimen for adalimumab in this study was 160 mg at week 0 followed by 80 mg at week 2. Adalimumab was well tolerated.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Gut Liver
                Gut Liver
                Gut and Liver
                Editorial Office of Gut and Liver
                1976-2283
                2005-1212
                November 2019
                17 June 2019
                : 13
                : 6
                : 604-616
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju, Korea
                [2 ]Department of Internal Medicine, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea
                Author notes
                Correspondence to: Won Moon, Department of Internal Medicine, Kosin University College of Medicine, 262 Gamcheon-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49267, Korea, Tel: +82-51-990-5207, Fax: +82-51-990-5055, E-mail: moonone70@ 123456hanmail.net
                Article
                gnl-13-604
                10.5009/gnl19019
                6860034
                31195433
                Copyright © 2019 by The Korean Society of Gastroenterology, the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the Korean Society of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Korean Association the Study of Intestinal Diseases, the Korean Association for the Study of the Liver, Korean Pancreatobiliary Association, and Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Cancer.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Review

                Gastroenterology & Hepatology

                inflammatory bowel diseases, crohn disease, colitis, ulcerative, therapy

                Comments

                Comment on this article