7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Correlation of visceral adiposity index with chronic kidney disease in the People’s Republic of China: to rediscover the new clinical potential of an old indicator for visceral obesity

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Aim

          To validate the association between visceral obesity and pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among individuals aged 40 years and above, and the potential of visceral adiposity index (VAI) to predict CKD.

          Methods

          This study was based on a cross-sectional epidemiologic study in the People’s Republic of China. A total of 1,581 residents aged over 40 years were included and divided into four groups based on VAI quartile intervals, namely, Groups I, II, III, and IV (eg, Group I included patients with their VAIs in the lowest quartile). Logistic regression analysis was performed.

          Results

          VAI is positively correlated with the albumin-to-creatinine ratio and the prevalence of CKD ( P<0.001), and is inversely related to estimated glomerular filtration rate ( P<0.001). Using Group I as control, odds ratios (ORs) were calculated to quantify the risk of developing CKD as VAI increased (Group II 1.08 [ P>0.05], Group III 1.57 [ P<0.05], Group IV 2.31 [ P<0.001]). Related factors like age and sex were normalized in the logistic model before calculation. ORs became 1.16 ( P>0.05), 1.59 ( P<0.05), and 2.14 ( P<0.05), respectively, for each group after further normalization considering smoking, drinking, physical activity, education, and the history of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. The same results were not observed after fasting blood glucose and blood pressure levels were included in the normalization. There was no significant difference in the ORs for different groups: 0.94 ( P>0.05), 1.11 ( P<0.05), and 1.68 ( P>0.05), respectively.

          Conclusion

          VAI is highly correlated with the prevalence of CKD in the population aged 40 years and above. It can be used to predict the pathogenesis of CKD, which is dependent on fasting blood glucose and blood pressure levels.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Waist circumference and abdominal sagittal diameter: best simple anthropometric indexes of abdominal visceral adipose tissue accumulation and related cardiovascular risk in men and women.

          The amount of abdominal visceral adipose tissue measured by computed tomography is a critical correlate of the potentially "atherogenic" metabolic disturbances associated with abdominal obesity. In this study conducted in samples of 81 men and 70 women, data are presented on the anthropometric correlates of abdominal visceral adipose tissue accumulation and related cardiovascular disease risk factors (triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, fasting and postglucose insulin and glucose levels). Results indicate that the waist circumference and the abdominal sagittal diameter are better correlates of abdominal visceral adipose tissue accumulation than the commonly used waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). In women, the waist circumference and the abdominal sagittal diameter also appeared more closely related to the metabolic variables than the WHR. When the samples were divided into quintiles of waist circumference, WHR or abdominal sagittal diameter, it was noted that increasing values of waist circumference and abdominal sagittal diameter were more consistently associated with increases in fasting and postglucose insulin levels than increasing values of WHR, especially in women. These findings suggest that the waist circumference or the abdominal sagittal diameter, rather than the WHR, should be used as indexes of abdominal visceral adipose tissue deposition and in the assessment of cardiovascular risk. It is suggested from these data that waist circumference values above approximately 100 cm, or abdominal sagittal diameter values > 25 cm are most likely to be associated with potentially "atherogenic" metabolic disturbances.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Visceral fat: a key mediator of steatohepatitis in metabolic liver disease.

            Visceral obesity is intimately associated with metabolic disease and adverse health outcomes. However, a direct association between increasing amounts of visceral fat and end-organ inflammation and scarring has not been demonstrated. We examined the association between visceral fat and liver inflammation in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to delineate the importance of visceral fat to progressive steatohepatitis and hence the inflammatory pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. We undertook a cross-sectional, proof of concept study in 38 consecutive adults with NAFLD at a tertiary liver clinic. All subjects had a complete physical examination, anthropometric assessment, and fasting blood tests on the day of liver biopsy. Abdominal fat volumes were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging within 2 weeks of liver biopsy. The extent of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis augmented incrementally with increases in visceral fat (P < 0.01). For each 1% increase in visceral fat, the odds ratio for increasing liver inflammation and fibrosis was 2.4 (confidence interval [CI]: 1.3-4.2) and 3.5 (CI: 1.7-7.1), respectively. Visceral fat remained an independent predictor of advanced steatohepatitis (odds ratio [OR] 2.1, CI: 1.1-4.2, P = 0.05) and fibrosis (OR 2.9, CI: 1.4-6.3, P = 0.006) even when controlled for insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, which correlated with visceral fat, also independently predicted increasing liver inflammation. Visceral fat was associated with all components of the metabolic syndrome. Visceral fat is directly associated with liver inflammation and fibrosis independent of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. Visceral fat should therefore be a central target for future interventions in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and indeed all metabolic disease.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Visceral obesity: the link among inflammation, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Ther Clin Risk Manag
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-6336
                1178-203X
                2016
                29 March 2016
                : 12
                : 489-494
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Nephrology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]Blood Purification Center, The Third Hospital of Zhengzhou, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
                [3 ]Department of Nephrology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
                [4 ]Department of Biostatistics, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China
                [5 ]Centre for BioAnalytical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Hequn Zou, Department of Nephrology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Southern Medical University, 183 Zhongshan Dadao, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510630, People’s Republic of China, Tel/fax +86 20 6278 4391, Email hequnzou2015@ 123456yeah.net
                Article
                tcrm-12-489
                10.2147/TCRM.S96340
                4820234
                27099507
                © 2016 Xu et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Medicine

                chronic kidney disease, visceral obesity, visceral adiposity index

                Comments

                Comment on this article