7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Improved Joint Mobility Associated with Reduced Inflammation Related to Consumption of Nopal Cactus Fruit Juice: Results from a Placebo-Controlled Trial Using Digital Inclinometry to Objectively Document Mobility of All Major Joints

      1

      Clinical Interventions in Aging

      Dove

      activities of daily living, C-reactive protein, pain, range of motion, wellness

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Objective

          To evaluate the effects of daily consumption of Nopal cactus fruit juice (NFJ) on joint mobility in a population experiencing chronic pain but otherwise in good health.

          Study Design

          A double-blind, placebo-controlled study design was used to enroll 40 people after written informed consent, randomized to consume 3 oz/day of NFJ versus placebo. At baseline and 8 weeks, joint range of motion (ROM) was examined by digital inclinometry along the vertical weight-bearing axis of the body from neck to knees and the shoulders. Blood samples were tested for cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP). Questionnaires addressed wellness, pain, and reliance on pain medications.

          Results

          After 8 weeks of consuming NFJ, participants showed improved ROM beyond that of participants consuming placebo. Cervical and thoracic/lumbar ROM for the NFJ group was significantly improved when compared to placebo (cervical: P<0.03, thoracic/lumbar: P<0.04). People consuming NFJ relied less on pain medication to complete daily activities ( P<0.1) and experienced reduced interference from pain and breathing issues (not significant). Serum levels of Eotaxin, involved in airway inflammation, showed significant differences between placebo and NFJ groups after 8 weeks ( P<0.048). Changes in CRP levels showed a larger reduction in the NFJ group (−13%) than in the placebo group (−4%) (not significant). In the subgroup with CRP levels between 1 and 9.9 mg/L at baseline, CRP levels decreased in the NFJ group (−30%) but increased in the placebo group (31%) ( P<0.015).

          Conclusion

          Consumption of NFJ for 8 weeks was associated with statistically significant improvements in joint mobility and physical functioning compared to the placebo group, allowing participants in the NFJ group to be more physically active; daily activities were easier, including walking, sitting, and lying. This was associated with reduced use of pain medication, possibly associated with anti-inflammatory properties of NFJ, as suggested by reduced Eotaxin and CRP levels.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Musculoskeletal Health Conditions Represent a Global Threat to Healthy Aging: A Report for the 2015 World Health Organization World Report on Ageing and Health.

          Persistent pain, impaired mobility and function, and reduced quality of life and mental well-being are the most common experiences associated with musculoskeletal conditions, of which there are more than 150 types. The prevalence and impact of musculoskeletal conditions increase with aging. A profound burden of musculoskeletal disease exists in developed and developing nations. Notably, this burden far exceeds service capacity. Population growth, aging, and sedentary lifestyles, particularly in developing countries, will create a crisis for population health that requires a multisystem response with musculoskeletal health services as a critical component. Globally, there is an emphasis on maintaining an active lifestyle to reduce the impacts of obesity, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, osteoporosis, and diabetes in older people. Painful musculoskeletal conditions, however, profoundly limit the ability of people to make these lifestyle changes. A strong relationship exists between painful musculoskeletal conditions and a reduced capacity to engage in physical activity resulting in functional decline, frailty, reduced well-being, and loss of independence. Multilevel strategies and approaches to care that adopt a whole person approach are needed to address the impact of impaired musculoskeletal health and its sequelae. Effective strategies are available to address the impact of musculoskeletal conditions; some are of low cost (e.g., primary care-based interventions) but others are expensive and, as such, are usually only feasible for developed nations. In developing nations, it is crucial that any reform or development initiatives, including research, must adhere to the principles of development effectiveness to avoid doing harm to the health systems in these settings.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            A dietary pattern including nopal, chia seed, soy protein, and oat reduces serum triglycerides and glucose intolerance in patients with metabolic syndrome.

            Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a health problem throughout the world and is associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to evaluate the effects of a dietary pattern (DP; soy protein, nopal, chia seed, and oat) on the biochemical variables of MetS, the AUC for glucose and insulin, glucose intolerance (GI), the relationship of the presence of certain polymorphisms related to MetS, and the response to the DP. In this randomized trial, the participants consumed their habitual diet but reduced by 500 kcal for 2 wk. They were then assigned to the placebo (P; n = 35) or DP (n = 32) group and consumed the reduced energy diet plus the P or DP beverage (235 kcal) minus the energy provided by these for 2 mo. All participants had decreases in body weight (BW), BMI, and waist circumference during the 2-mo treatment (P < 0.0001); however, only the DP group had decreases in serum TG, C-reactive protein (CRP), and AUC for insulin and GI after a glucose tolerance test. Interestingly, participants in the DP group with MetS and the ABCA1 R230C variant had a greater decrease in BW and an increase in serum adiponectin concentration after 2 mo of dietary treatment than those with the ABCA1 R230R variant. The results from this study suggest that lifestyle interventions involving specific DP for the treatment of MetS could be more effective if local foods and genetic variations of the population are considered.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Nopal (Opuntia ficus indica) protects from metabolic endotoxemia by modifying gut microbiota in obese rats fed high fat/sucrose diet

              Current efforts are directed to reducing the gut dysbiosis and inflammation produced by obesity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether consuming nopal, a vegetable rich in dietary fibre, vitamin C, and polyphenols can reduce the metabolic consequences of obesity by modifying the gut microbiota and preventing metabolic endotoxemia in rats fed a high fat and sucrose diet. With this aim, rats were fed a high fat diet with 5% sucrose in the drinking water (HFS) for 7 months and then were fed for 1 month with HFS + 5% nopal (HFS + N). The composition of gut microbiota was assessed by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene. Nopal modified gut microbiota and increased intestinal occludin-1 in the HFS + N group. This was associated with a decrease in metabolic endotoxemia, glucose insulinotropic peptide, glucose intolerance, lipogenesis, and metabolic inflexibility. These changes were accompanied by reduced hepatic steatosis and oxidative stress in adipose tissue and brain, and improved cognitive function, associated with an increase in B. fragilis. This study supports the use of nopal as a functional food and prebiotic for its ability to modify gut microbiota and to reduce metabolic endotoxemia and other obesity-related biochemical abnormalities.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clin Interv Aging
                Clin Interv Aging
                cia
                clinintag
                Clinical Interventions in Aging
                Dove
                1176-9092
                1178-1998
                09 December 2020
                2020
                : 15
                : 2341-2352
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Natural Products Research, NIS Labs , Klamath Falls, Oregon, 97601, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Gitte S Jensen Natural Products Research, NIS Labs , 1437 Esplanade, Klamath Falls, Oregon97601, USATel +1 541 884-0112 Email gitte@nislabs.com
                Article
                267451
                10.2147/CIA.S267451
                7734066
                © 2020 Jensen.

                This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms ( https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php).

                Page count
                Figures: 4, Tables: 11, References: 35, Pages: 12
                Categories
                Original Research

                Health & Social care

                activities of daily living, c-reactive protein, pain, range of motion, wellness

                Comments

                Comment on this article