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      Expression and localization of immunoreactive-sialomucin complex (Muc4) in salivary glands

      , , , , , ,

      Tissue and Cell

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 28

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          Use of avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) in immunoperoxidase techniques: a comparison between ABC and unlabeled antibody (PAP) procedures.

           S. Hsu,  L Raine,  H Fanger (1981)
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            Epithelial mucin genes.

            The last seven years have been exciting in the world of mucin biology. Molecular analyses of mucin genes and deduced protein structures have provided insight into structural features of mucins and tools with which to examine expression, secretion, and glycosylation, thereby enabling a better understanding of the role of mucins in normal physiological processes and in disease. Functional studies are in progress both in vitro using cDNAs and cell lines and in vivo utilizing mutant mice in which a particular mucin gene has been inactivated or overexpressed. These studies should help determine whether the functions of mucins are restricted to protection and lubrication, or if they are involved in the adhesion of tumor cells to other cells or tissue components or in modulation of the immune system.
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              Mucin-type glycoproteins.

              Considerable advances have been made in recent years in our understanding of the biochemistry of mucin-type glycoproteins. This class of compounds is characterized mainly by a high level of O-linked oligosaccharides. Initially, the glycoproteins were solely known as the major constituents of mucus. Recent studies have shown that mucins from the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, salivary glands, sweat glands, breast, and tumor cells are structurally related to high-molecular-weight glycoproteins, which are produced by epithelial cells as membrane proteins. During mucin synthesis, an orchestrated sequence of events results in giant molecules of Mr 4 to 6 x 10(6), which are stored in mucous granules until secretion. Once secreted, mucin forms a barrier, not only to protect the delicate epithelial cells against the extracellular environment, but also to select substances for binding and uptake by these epithelia. This review is designed to critically examine relations between structure and function of the different compounds categorized as mucin glycoproteins.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Tissue and Cell
                Tissue and Cell
                Elsevier BV
                00408166
                February 2001
                February 2001
                : 33
                : 1
                : 111-118
                10.1054/tice.2000.0162
                © 2001

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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