10
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Effect and mechanism of fluoxetine on electrophysiology in vivo in a rat model of postmyocardial infarction depression

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Major depression is diagnosed in 18% of patients following myocardial infarction (MI), and the antidepressant fluoxetine is shown to effectively decrease depressive symptoms and improve coronary heart disease prognosis. We observed the effect of fluoxetine on cardiac electrophysiology in vivo in a rat model of post-MI depression and the potential mechanism.

          Methods and results

          Eighty adult male Sprague Dawley rats (200–250 g) were randomly assigned to five groups: normal control (control group), MI (MI group), depression (depression group), post-MI depression (model group), and post-MI depression treated with intragastric administration of 10 mg/kg fluoxetine (fluoxetine group). MI was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Depression was developed by 4-week chronic mild stress (CMS). Behavior measurement was done before and during the experiment. Electrophysiology study in vivo and Western blot analysis were carried on after 4 weeks of CMS. After 4 weeks of CMS, depression-like behaviors were observed in the MI, depression, and model groups, and chronic fluoxetine administration could significantly improve those behaviors ( P<0.05 vs model group). Fluoxetine significantly increased the ventricular fibrillation threshold compared with the model group (20.20±9.32 V vs 14.67±1.85 V, P<0.05). Expression of Kv4.2 was significantly reduced by 29%±12%, 24%±6%, and 41%±15%, respectively, in the MI group, CMS group, and model group, which could be improved by fluoxetine (30%±9%). But fluoxetine showed no improvement on the MI-induced loss of Cx43.

          Conclusion

          The susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias was increased in depression and post-MI depression rats, and fluoxetine may reduce the incidence of ventricular arrhythmia in post-MI depression rats and thus improve the prognosis. This may be related in part to the upregulation of Kv4.2 by fluoxetine.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 31

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Depression and 18-month prognosis after myocardial infarction.

          We previously reported that major depression in patients in the hospital after a myocardial infarction (MI) substantially increases the risk of mortality during the first 6 months. We examined the impact of depression over 18 months and present additional evidence concerning potential mechanisms linking depression and mortality. Two-hundred twenty-two patients responded to a modified version of the National Institute of Mental Health Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) for a major depressive episode at approximately 7 days after MI. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which measures depressive symptomatology, was also completed by 218 of the patients. All patients and/or families were contacted at 18 months to determine survival status. Thirty-five patients met the modified DIS criteria for major in-hospital depression after the MI. Sixty-eight had BDI scores > or = 10, indicative of mild to moderate symptoms of depression. There were 21 deaths during the follow-up period, including 19 from cardiac causes. Seven of these deaths occurred among patients who met DIS criteria for depression, and 12 occurred among patients with elevated BDI scores. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that both the DIS (odds ratio, 3.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32 to 10.05; P = .012) and elevated BDI scores (odds ratio, 7.82; 95% CI, 2.42 to 25.26; P = .0002) were significantly related to 18-month cardiac mortality. After we controlled for the other significant multivariate predictors of mortality in the data set (previous MI, Killip class, premature ventricular contractions [PVCs] of > or = 10 per hour), the impact of the BDI score remained significant (adjusted odds ratio, 6.64; 95% CI, 1.76 to 25.09; P = .0026). In addition, the interaction of PVCs and BDI score marginally improved the model (P = .094). The interaction showed that deaths were concentrated among depressed patients with PVCs of > or = 10 per hour (odds ratio, 29.1; 95% CI, 6.97 to 122.07; P or = 10 PVCs per hour. This result is compatible with the literature suggesting an arrhythmic mechanism as the link between psychological factors and sudden cardiac death and underscores the importance of developing screening and treatment programs for post-MI depression.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Prognostic association of depression following myocardial infarction with mortality and cardiovascular events: a meta-analysis.

            To assess the association of depression following myocardial infarction (MI) and cardiovascular prognosis. The authors performed a meta-analysis of references derived from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PSYCINFO (1975-2003) combined with crossreferencing without language restrictions. The authors selected prospective studies that determined the association of depression with the cardiovascular outcome of MI patients, defined as mortality and cardiovascular events within 2 years from index MI. Depression had to be assessed within 3 months after MI using established psychiatric instruments. A quality assessment was performed. Twenty-two papers met the selection criteria. These studies described follow up (on average, 13.7 months) of 6367 MI patients (16 cohorts). Post-MI depression was significantly associated with all-cause mortality (odds ratio [OR], fixed 2.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.76-3.22; p <.00001) and cardiac mortality (OR fixed, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.77-3.77; p <.00001). Depressive MI patients were also at risk for new cardiovascular events (OR random, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.33-2.85; p = .0006). Secondary analyses showed no significant effects of follow-up duration (0-6 months or longer) or assessment of depression (self-report questionnaire vs. interview). However, the year of data collection (before or after 1992) tended to influence the effect of depression on mortality (p = .08), with stronger associations found in the earlier studies (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 2.14-4.86) compared with the later studies (OR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.45-2.78). Post-MI depression is associated with a 2- to 2.5-fold increased risk of impaired cardiovascular outcome. The association of depression with cardiac mortality or all-cause mortality was more pronounced in the older studies (OR, 3.22 before 1992) than in the more recent studies (OR, 2.01 after 1992).
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Effects of citalopram and interpersonal psychotherapy on depression in patients with coronary artery disease: the Canadian Cardiac Randomized Evaluation of Antidepressant and Psychotherapy Efficacy (CREATE) trial.

              Few randomized controlled trials have evaluated the efficacy of treatments for major depression in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). None have simultaneously evaluated an antidepressant and short-term psychotherapy. To document the short-term efficacy of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (citalopram) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in reducing depressive symptoms in patients with CAD and major depression. The Canadian Cardiac Randomized Evaluation of Antidepressant and Psychotherapy Efficacy, a randomized, controlled, 12-week, parallel-group, 2 x 2 factorial trial conducted May 1, 2002, to March 20, 2006, among 284 patients with CAD from 9 Canadian academic centers. All patients met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for diagnosis of major depression of 4 weeks' duration or longer and had baseline 24-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) scores of 20 or higher. Participants underwent 2 separate randomizations: (1) to receive 12 weekly sessions of IPT plus clinical management (n = 142) or clinical management only (n = 142) and (2) to receive 12 weeks of citalopram, 20 to 40 mg/d (n = 142), or matching placebo (n = 142). The primary outcome measure was change between baseline and 12 weeks on the 24-item HAM-D, administered blindly during centralized telephone interviews (tested at alpha = .033); the secondary outcome measure was self-reported Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) score (tested at alpha = .017). Citalopram was superior to placebo in reducing 12-week HAM-D scores (mean difference, 3.3 points; 96.7% confidence interval [CI], 0.80-5.85; P = .005), with a small to medium effect size of 0.33. Mean HAM-D response (52.8% vs 40.1%; P = .03) and remission rates (35.9% vs 22.5%; P = .01) and the reduction in BDI-II scores (difference, 3.6 points; 98.3% CI, 0.58-6.64; P = .005; effect size = 0.33) also favored citalopram. There was no evidence of a benefit of IPT over clinical management, with the mean HAM-D difference favoring clinical management (-2.26 points; 96.7% CI, -4.78 to 0.27; P = .06; effect size, 0.23). The difference on the BDI-II did not favor clinical management (1.13 points; 98.3% CI, -1.90 to 4.16; P = .37; effect size = 0.11). This trial documents the efficacy of citalopram administered in conjunction with weekly clinical management for major depression among patients with CAD and found no evidence of added value of IPT over clinical management. Based on these results and those of previous trials, citalopram or sertraline plus clinical management should be considered as a first-step treatment for patients with CAD and major depression. isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN15858091.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2015
                10 February 2015
                : 9
                : 763-772
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Cardiology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China
                [2 ]Cardiovascular Research Institute, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China
                [3 ]Masonic Medical Research Laboratory, Utica, NY, USA
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Bo Yang, Department of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, No 238 Jiefang Road, Wuchang District, Wuhan, Hubei 430060, People’s Republic of China, Tel +86 27 8804 1911, Fax +86 27 8804 2292, Email yybb112@ 123456whu.edu.cn
                Dan Hu, Masonic Medical Research Laboratory, 2150 Bleecker Street, Utica, NY 13501, USA, Tel +1 315 735 2217, Fax +1 315 735 5648, Email dianah@ 123456mmrl.edu
                Article
                dddt-9-763
                10.2147/DDDT.S75863
                4330040
                25709400
                © 2015 Liang et al. This work is published by Dove Medical Press Limited, and licensed under Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License

                The full terms of the License are available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Comments

                Comment on this article