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      Vascular Disease and Atherosclerosis in Uremia

      Blood Purification

      S. Karger AG

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          Most cited references 3

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          Arterial calcification and pathology in uremic patients undergoing dialysis.

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            Changes of vascular architecture independent of blood pressure in experimental uremia.

            Striking alterations of the structure of arterial vessels of different caliber are a well-known feature of renal failure, but it is currently unknown to what extent they are a reflection of hypertension or of uremia per se. To address this issue further we studied subtotally nephrectomized rats, sham-operated and pair-fed with matched controls. After uremia of 14 days' duration, stereologic measurements were carried out on perfusion-fixed tissue. To eliminate a potential influence of hypertension, subgroups of animals received furosemide and hydralazine in the drinking fluid to yield daily doses of 15 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg, respectively. At the end of the experiment, systolic blood pressure (tail plethysmography) was 110 +/- 13.3 (mean +/- SD) mm Hg and 99.4 +/- 8.1 mm Hg in untreated and treated controls, respectively, and 132 +/- 20.7 mm Hg and 103 +/- 13.0 mm Hg in untreated and treated uremic animals, respectively (n = 5 to 10 animals per group). The wall:lumen ratio of intramyocardial small arteries was 0.056 +/- 0.011 and 0.052 +/- 0.006 in untreated and treated controls, respectively. In untreated and treated uremic animals, the corresponding values were 0.077 +/- 0.011 and 0.066 +/- 0.007 (P < .01; control v uremia, ANOVA). A similar increase, unaffected by blood pressure treatment, was found for wall thickness of intramyocardial arteries. Analogous changes were also noted in mesenteric arterioles and veins. Finally, aorta media thickness was significantly (P < .005) higher in uremic animals than in controls (138 +/- 29 micrometers v 103 +/- micrometers).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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              Effect of hyperparathyroidism on arterial distensibility in renal transplant recipients.

              The cushioning function of the arterial system is altered in patients with end-stage renal failure. The role of hyperparathyroidism for the altered vessel wall properties of large arteries not known. To exclude the confounding effects of fluid volume changes and hypercirculation as well as uremic toxicity on vessel wall properties from those of hyperparathyroidism, the present study was conducted in 54 normotensive renal transplant recipients with good graft function, three to six months after transplantation. The vessel wall properties of the common carotid artery were investigated in 32 of them, who had increased plasma intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) levels (136 +/- 12 ng/liter, SEM), and compared to those of 22 control recipients of same age with normal plasma iPTH levels (34 +/- 4 ng/liter). Arterial distension was measured by Doppler analysis of the vessel wall movements, blood pressure was determined by sphygmomanometry. Blood pressure was 140 +/- 3/85 +/- 2 mm Hg in renal transplant recipients with hyperparathyroidism, 135 +/- 3/83 +/- 1 mm Hg in patients with normal plasma iPTH levels (NS). There was no difference in enddiastolic diameter of the common carotid artery (7.4 +/- 0.2 mm) in renal transplant recipients with hyperparathyroidism as compared with the control patients (7.3 +/- 0.2 mm; NS). Renal transplant recipients with hyperparathyroidism had a lower distension (389 +/- 27 microns vs. 486 +/- 28 microns, P < 0.05) and distensibility coefficient of the common carotid artery (15.1 +/- 1.1 10(-3)/kPa vs. DC 19.0 +/- 1.0 10(-3)/kPa, P < 0.001) when compared with the control patients. Multiple regression analysis showed that the distensibility coefficient of the common carotid artery was negatively correlated with age (P < 0.001), mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.05) and plasma iPTH levels (P < 0.05). The effects of plasma iPTH levels were not related to serum calcium concentrations or to differences in the enddiastolic diameter of the common carotid artery. The data suggest that secondary hyperparathyroidism can affect the cushioning function of larger arteries in patients with end-stage renal failure independently of high blood pressure.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                BPU
                Blood Purif
                10.1159/issn.0253-5068
                Blood Purification
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-7186-9
                978-3-318-00668-1
                0253-5068
                1421-9735
                2001
                2001
                28 December 2000
                : 19
                : 2
                : 139-142
                Affiliations
                Manhes Hospital, Fleury-Mérogis, and Broussais Hospital, Paris, France
                Article
                46931 Blood Purif 2001;19:139–142
                10.1159/000046931
                11150800
                © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Pages: 4
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46931
                Categories
                Paper

                Cardiovascular Medicine, Nephrology

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