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      • Record: found
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      Modifiable Gene Expression in Mice: Kidney-Specific Deletion of a Target Gene via the Cre-loxP System

      ,

      Cardiorenal Medicine

      S. Karger AG

      Gene targeting, Transgenic mice, Kidney, Tissue-specific gene targeting, Cre-loxP system

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          Abstract

          With the advent of gene-targeting in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells, the use of knockout mice to study the physiological effects of loss of gene function has become increasingly prevalent. However, there are several drawbacks with conventional gene-targeting approaches which may make phenotyping of the resultant mice difficult, if not, impossible. Conventional gene-targeting results in the loss of function of the targeted gene in all cells and tissues, which can be problematic for genes which are required developmentally, which exhibit a wide tissue-specific expression pattern, or are part of complex paracrine systems. As with mice that lack the angiotensinogen or endothelin-1 gene, loss of gene function may lead to a lethal phenotype which can be manifested during embryonic development, at birth or postnatally. These limitations could potentially be circumvented by using a system in which the loss of gene function is placed under spatial and/or temporal control. We will discuss how the cre-loxP recombinase system can be applied to delete a gene in a tissue- and developmentally regulated fashion.

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          Most cited references 9

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          Subregion- and cell type-restricted gene knockout in mouse brain.

          Using the phage P1-derived Cre/loxP recombination system, we have developed a method to create mice in which the deletion (knockout) of virtually any gene of interest is restricted to a subregion or a specific cell type in the brain such as the pyramidal cells of the hippocampal CA1 region. The Cre/loxP recombination-based gene deletion appears to require a certain level of Cre protein expression. The brain subregional restricted gene knockout should allow a more precise analysis of the impact of a gene mutation on animal behaviors.
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            NRSF/REST is required in vivo for repression of multiple neuronal target genes during embryogenesis.

            The neuron-restrictive silencer factor NRSF (also known as REST and XBR) can silence transcription from neuronal promoters in non-neuronal cell lines, but its function during normal development is unknown. In mice, a targeted mutation of Rest, the gene encoding NRSF, caused derepression of neuron-specific tubulin in a subset of non-neural tissues and embryonic lethality. Mosaic inhibition of NRSF in chicken embryos, using a dominant-negative form of NRSF, also caused derepression of neuronal tubulin, as well as of several other neuronal target genes, in both non-neural tissues and central nervous system neuronal progenitors. These results indicate that NRSF is required to repress neuronal gene expression in vivo, in both extra-neural and undifferentiated neural tissue.
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              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Elevated blood pressure and craniofacial abnormalities in mice deficient in endothelin-1.

              The endothelin-1 (ET-1) gene was disrupted in mouse embryonic stem cells by homologous recombination to generate mice deficient in ET-1. These ET-1-/- homozygous mice die of respiratory failure at birth and have morphological abnormalities of the pharyngeal-arch-derived craniofacial tissues and organs. ET-1+/- heterozygous mice, which produce lower levels of ET-1 than wild-type mice, develop elevated blood pressure. These results suggest that ET-1 is essential for normal mouse development and may also play a physiological role in cardiovascular homeostasis.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                EXN
                Nephron Exp Nephrol
                10.1159/issn.1660-2129
                Cardiorenal Medicine
                S. Karger AG
                1660-2129
                1998
                December 1998
                06 November 1998
                : 6
                : 6
                : 568-575
                Affiliations
                Departments of Internal Medicine and Physiology and Biophysics, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
                Article
                20573 Exp Nephrol 1998;6:568–575
                10.1159/000020573
                © 1998 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                Figures: 4, Tables: 1, References: 41, Pages: 8
                Product
                Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/20573
                Categories
                Technical Seminar<br>Modifiable Transgene Expression in the Kidney

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