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      Combining the Power of Stories and the Power of Numbers: Mixed Methods Research and Mixed Studies Reviews

      1 , 1
      Annual Review of Public Health
      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          This article provides an overview of mixed methods research and mixed studies reviews. These two approaches are used to combine the strengths of quantitative and qualitative methods and to compensate for their respective limitations. This article is structured in three main parts. First, the epistemological background for mixed methods will be presented. Afterward, we present the main types of mixed methods research designs and techniques as well as guidance for planning, conducting, and appraising mixed methods research. In the last part, we describe the main types of mixed studies reviews and provide a tool kit and examples. Future research needs to offer guidance for assessing mixed methods research and reporting mixed studies reviews, among other challenges.

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          Most cited references49

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          SAGE Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social & Behavioral Research

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            Barriers to participation in clinical trials of cancer: a meta-analysis and systematic review of patient-reported factors.

            Enrolling participants onto clinical trials of cancer presents an important challenge. We aimed to identify the concerns of patients with cancer about, and the barriers to, participation in clinical trials. We did a systematic review to assess studies of barriers to participation in experimental trials and randomised trials for validity and content. We estimated the frequency with which patients identified particular issues by pooling across studies that presented data for barriers to participation in clinical trials as proportions. We analysed 12 qualitative studies (n=722) and 21 quantitative studies (n=5452). Two qualitative studies inquired of patients who were currently enrolled onto clinical trials, and ten inquired of patients who were eligible for enrolment onto various clinical trials. Barriers to participation in clinical trials were protocol-related, patient-related, or physician-related. The most common reasons cited as barriers included: concerns with the trial setting; a dislike of randomisation; general discomfort with the research process; complexity and stringency of the protocol; presence of a placebo or no-treatment group; potential side-effects; being unaware of trial opportunities; the idea that clinical trials are not appropriate for serious diseases; fear that trial involvement would have a negative effect on the relationship with their physician; and their physician's attitudes towards the trial. Meta-analysis confirmed the findings of our systematic review. The identification of such barriers to the participation in clinical trials should help trialists to develop strategies that will keep to a maximum participation and cooperation in cancer trials, while informing and protecting prospective participants adequately.
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              Configurational Comparative Methods: Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) and Related Techniques

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Public Health
                Annu. Rev. Public Health
                Annual Reviews
                0163-7525
                1545-2093
                March 18 2014
                March 18 2014
                : 35
                : 1
                : 29-45
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Family Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3S 1Z1, Canada; email: ,
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-publhealth-032013-182440
                24188053
                7386fd5a-eeac-41fc-9df7-9e19f509b4ba
                © 2014
                History

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