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      A novel soft keyboard for touchscreen phones: QWERT

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          Abstract

          The popularity of touchscreen phones has been growing around the world since the iPhones and Android phones were released. More and more mobile phones with large touchscreen have been produced, however, the phones with small size displays are still in the majority of touch phones. The foremost interface on touch smartphones is the information input module using soft keyboards. Traditional input methods on touch phones have either too small key buttons (such as QWERTY) or too many functions (such as 3\(\times\)4 keyboard), which are inconvenient to use. Moreover, the conventional soft keyboards only use tapping to input texts while current touch smartphones allow various gestures on the touchscreen, such as sliding. In this paper, a novel soft keyboard called QWERT is proposed for touchscreen-based smartphones. The users can interact with phones via finger gestures of tapping or sliding when input text by using the QWERT. In doing so, the interactions between users and smartphones will be faster and easier. An experiment carried out on inexperienced human subjects shows that they can learn very fast due to their familiarities with QWERTY. A simulation experiment based on a cognitive architecture, ACT-R, was also conducted to predict the movement time (MT) of experienced human subjects. The simulation results show that the MT using QWERT outperforms other default keyboards. These outcomes imply that the novel QWERT is a viable option for touch smartphone users. Based on the novel design, an application is released on Android systems. This application is expected to give better user experience for customers who use touch smartphones.

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          Most cited references 6

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          ACT-R/PM and menu selection: applying a cognitive architecture to HCI

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            Standing at a kiosk: effects of key size and spacing on touch screen numeric keypad performance and user preference.

             Keith Hiszem,  H Colle (2004)
            Touch screen input keys compete with other information for limited screen space. The present study estimated the smallest key size that would not degrade performance or user satisfaction. Twenty participants used finger touches to enter one, four or 10 digits in a numeric keypad displayed on a capacitive touch screen, while standing in front of a touch screen kiosk. Key size (10, 15, 20, 25 mm square) and edge-to-edge key spacing (1, 3 mm) were factorially combined. Performance was evaluated with response time and errors, and user preferences were obtained. Spacing had no measurable effects. Entry times were longer and errors were higher for smaller key sizes, but no significant differences were found between key sizes of 20 and 25 mm. Participants also preferred 20 mm keys to smaller keys, and they were indifferent between 20 and 25 mm keys. Therefore, a key size of 20 mm was found to be sufficiently large for land-on key entry.
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              The Effect of Age and Font Size on Reading Text on Handheld Computers

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                04 November 2013
                Article
                10.1504/IJHFE.2013.059374
                1311.0709
                73a96a02-6f0a-4dec-b835-13faef03f636

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                Int. J. of Human Factors and Ergonomics, 2013 Vol.2, No.4, pp.246 - 261
                cs.HC

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