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      Computer vision for assistive technologies

      , , , ,
      Computer Vision and Image Understanding
      Elsevier BV

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          Robust Object Tracking with Online Multiple Instance Learning.

          In this paper, we address the problem of tracking an object in a video given its location in the first frame and no other information. Recently, a class of tracking techniques called "tracking by detection" has been shown to give promising results at real-time speeds. These methods train a discriminative classifier in an online manner to separate the object from the background. This classifier bootstraps itself by using the current tracker state to extract positive and negative examples from the current frame. Slight inaccuracies in the tracker can therefore lead to incorrectly labeled training examples, which degrade the classifier and can cause drift. In this paper, we show that using Multiple Instance Learning (MIL) instead of traditional supervised learning avoids these problems and can therefore lead to a more robust tracker with fewer parameter tweaks. We propose a novel online MIL algorithm for object tracking that achieves superior results with real-time performance. We present thorough experimental results (both qualitative and quantitative) on a number of challenging video clips.
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            Fast Feature Pyramids for Object Detection.

            Multi-resolution image features may be approximated via extrapolation from nearby scales, rather than being computed explicitly. This fundamental insight allows us to design object detection algorithms that are as accurate, and considerably faster, than the state-of-the-art. The computational bottleneck of many modern detectors is the computation of features at every scale of a finely-sampled image pyramid. Our key insight is that one may compute finely sampled feature pyramids at a fraction of the cost, without sacrificing performance: for a broad family of features we find that features computed at octave-spaced scale intervals are sufficient to approximate features on a finely-sampled pyramid. Extrapolation is inexpensive as compared to direct feature computation. As a result, our approximation yields considerable speedups with negligible loss in detection accuracy. We modify three diverse visual recognition systems to use fast feature pyramids and show results on both pedestrian detection (measured on the Caltech, INRIA, TUD-Brussels and ETH data sets) and general object detection (measured on the PASCAL VOC). The approach is general and is widely applicable to vision algorithms requiring fine-grained multi-scale analysis. Our approximation is valid for images with broad spectra (most natural images) and fails for images with narrow band-pass spectra (e.g., periodic textures).
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              Vision based hand gesture recognition for human computer interaction: a survey

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Computer Vision and Image Understanding
                Computer Vision and Image Understanding
                Elsevier BV
                10773142
                January 2017
                January 2017
                : 154
                :
                : 1-15
                Article
                10.1016/j.cviu.2016.09.001
                73c3e682-d79e-439e-a2a2-44b2f1e8edc7
                © 2017

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