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Factors associated with the utilization of institutional and home birth services among women in Ethiopia: A scoping review

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the factors associated with the use of institutional delivery and home birth services among women in Ethiopia.

Methods: Fifteen peer-reviewed, primary research articles published between 2011 and 2015 were selected for this scoping review. The articles included case-control, cross-sectional, and retrospective follow-up studies conducted in Ethiopia.

Results: Findings were categorized with use of content and factorial analysis. The data in this scoping review revealed a significant inequality in skilled care use among Ethiopian women with differences in economic status, education, residence, autonomy in decision making, parity, and antenatal care attendance.

Conclusion: Sociodemographic, accessibility, and obstetric factors are key determinants of skilled care utilization. Strategies and policy changes to address maternal health service use should aim to improve economic status, facilitate higher education, increase access to care, promote the empowerment of women, and enhance antenatal care initiatives. Additional research should be conducted to evaluate the influence of the media and culture on skilled care utilization, since few studies have examined these factors.

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Most cited references 30

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Trend and socio-demographic differentials of Caesarean section rate in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: analysis based on Ethiopia demographic and health surveys data

Background According to the World Health Organization, Caesarean Section (CS) rate (percentage of births managed by CS) exceeding 15% lacks medical justification and it could be linked with adverse maternal and child health consequences. Nonetheless, the rate in Addis Ababa city is beyond the aforementioned level. The objectives of the study were to assess the trend and socio-demographic differentials of CS rate in the city. Methods The study was made based on the three Ethiopia Demographic and Health Surveys (EDHS) data (EDHS 2000, 2005 and 2011). The trend over the period of 1995–2010 was assessed using simple linear regression analysis whereas the differentials of CS rate were identified based on DHS 2011 data. CS rates were compared across categories of various socio-economic variables using chi-square test. Results The CS rate increased significantly from 2.3% in 1995–1996 to 24.4% in 2009–2010. From 2003 onwards, it persisted above 15%. The rates among women with secondary (32.3%) or higher (33.3%) levels of education were nearly two times higher than the corresponding figures in the illiterates (14.8%) and women with primary education (15.8%) (P < 0.001). The level among women from the ‘rich’ households (28.6%) was higher than those from the ‘poor’ (16.4%) and ‘middle’ (19.5%) households (P = 0.016). The rate also significantly increased with rising parity (P = 0.023). The rate among women who delivered in private health institutions (41.7%) was twice higher than their counterparts who delivered in public institutions (20.6%). Conclusion The CS rate in Addis Ababa has exceeded beyond the level recommended by the WHO. Accordingly, It should be maintained within the optimum 5-15% range by introducing medical audit for labor management both in the private and public health institutions. Further, during prenatal care pregnant women should be fully informed about the risks of medically unjustified CS.
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Factors associated with institutional delivery in Ghana: the role of decision-making autonomy and community norms

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Association between social support and place of delivery: a cross-sectional study in Kericho, Western Kenya

Author and article information

Affiliations
1Department of Nursing, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada
2Faculty of Community Services, School of Occupational and Public Health, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada
Author notes
CORRESPONDING AUTHORS: Bronwyn Lapp, RN, BScN Department of Nursing, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada, E-mail: bronwyn.lapp@123456sunnybrook.ca; David Zakus, BSc, MES, MSc, PhD, Faculty of Community Services, School of Occupational and Public Health, Ryerson University, Room POD249, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada, E-mail: dzakus@123456ryerson.ca
Journal
FMCH
Family Medicine and Community Health
FMCH
Family Medicine and Community Health & American Chinese Medical Education Association (USA)
2009-8774
2305-6983
December 2016
December 2016
: 4
: 4
: 30-43
Copyright © 2016 Family Medicine and Community Health

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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