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      Factors associated with the utilization of institutional and home birth services among women in Ethiopia: A scoping review

      , 1 , , 2

      Family Medicine and Community Health

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      Maternal health, obstetrics, midwifery, Ethiopia

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          Abstract

          Objective: To examine the factors associated with the use of institutional delivery and home birth services among women in Ethiopia.

          Methods: Fifteen peer-reviewed, primary research articles published between 2011 and 2015 were selected for this scoping review. The articles included case-control, cross-sectional, and retrospective follow-up studies conducted in Ethiopia.

          Results: Findings were categorized with use of content and factorial analysis. The data in this scoping review revealed a significant inequality in skilled care use among Ethiopian women with differences in economic status, education, residence, autonomy in decision making, parity, and antenatal care attendance.

          Conclusion: Sociodemographic, accessibility, and obstetric factors are key determinants of skilled care utilization. Strategies and policy changes to address maternal health service use should aim to improve economic status, facilitate higher education, increase access to care, promote the empowerment of women, and enhance antenatal care initiatives. Additional research should be conducted to evaluate the influence of the media and culture on skilled care utilization, since few studies have examined these factors.

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          Most cited references 47

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          Use of antenatal services and delivery care among women in rural western Kenya: a community based survey

          Background Improving maternal health is one of the UN Millennium Development Goals. We assessed provision and use of antenatal services and delivery care among women in rural Kenya to determine whether women were receiving appropriate care. Methods Population-based cross-sectional survey among women who had recently delivered. Results Of 635 participants, 90% visited the antenatal clinic (ANC) at least once during their last pregnancy (median number of visits 4). Most women (64%) first visited the ANC in the third trimester; a perceived lack of quality in the ANC was associated with a late first ANC visit (Odds ratio [OR] 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0–2.4). Women who did not visit an ANC were more likely to have 90%), but provision of other services was low, e.g. malaria prevention (21%), iron (53%) and folate (44%) supplementation, syphilis testing (19.4%) and health talks (14.4%). Eighty percent of women delivered outside a health facility; among these, traditional birth attendants assisted 42%, laypersons assisted 36%, while 22% received no assistance. Factors significantly associated with giving birth outside a health facility included: age ≥ 30 years, parity ≥ 5, low SES, 1 hour walking distance from the health facility. Women who delivered unassisted were more likely to be of parity ≥ 5 (AOR 5.7, 95% CI 2.8–11.6). Conclusion In this rural area, usage of the ANC was high, but this opportunity to deliver important health services was not fully utilized. Use of professional delivery services was low, and almost 1 out of 5 women delivered unassisted. There is an urgent need to improve this dangerous situation.
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            Association Between Disrespect and Abuse During Childbirth and Women's Confidence in Health Facilities in Tanzania.

            In Tanzania, maternal mortality is high and coverage with health facility delivery low, despite efforts to reduce barriers to utilization. Disrespect and abuse during childbirth has not been explored as a contributor to delivery satisfaction or as a deterrent to institutional delivery. We assessed the association between reported disrespectful treatment during childbirth and delivery satisfaction, perceived quality of care, and intention to deliver at the same facility in the future.
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              Factors associated with home delivery in Bahirdar, Ethiopia: A case control study

              Background In Ethiopia although pregnant mothers increasingly attend antenatal clinics, utilization of skilled delivery service remains very low. The individual or health system factors that affect women’s preferences for delivery places are not well known. Method A case control study was conducted in July 2010 to assess factors associated with utilization of institutional delivery service. A total of 324 mothers who recently delivered and visited either postnatal care or sought immunization services were included. Cases (n = 108) were mothers who gave birth at home and controls (n = 216) were those who delivered at health facility. Pre-tested and standardized questionnaires were used to collect relevant data by trained data collectors. Logistic regression model was used to control for confounding. Result The likelihood of delivering at home was greater among mothers with inadequate knowledge of pregnancy related services (AOR = 62, 95% CI: 3, 128.4), those who started attending ANC after 24 weeks of gestation (AOR 8.7, 95% CI: 2.2, 33.3), mothers having no formal education (Adjusted OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.63, 11.27) and rural residents (AOR = 3.6, 95%CI: 1.4, 9.0). Conclusion The predominant factors associated with home delivery services were lack of knowledge about obstetrics care, delay in starting Antenatal Care (ANC) follow up, having, Illiteracy and rural residence. Audience specific behavioral change communication should be designed to improve the demand for delivery services. Health professionals should take the opportunity to encourage mothers attend delivery services during ANC follow up. Improvements should be made in social conditions including literacy and major social mobilization endeavors.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                FMCH
                Family Medicine and Community Health
                FMCH
                Compuscript (Ireland )
                2009-8774
                2305-6983
                December 2016
                December 2016
                : 4
                : 4
                : 30-43
                Affiliations
                1Department of Nursing, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada
                2Faculty of Community Services, School of Occupational and Public Health, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada
                Author notes
                CORRESPONDING AUTHORS: Bronwyn Lapp, RN, BScN Department of Nursing, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Ave, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada, E-mail: bronwyn.lapp@ 123456sunnybrook.ca ; David Zakus, BSc, MES, MSc, PhD, Faculty of Community Services, School of Occupational and Public Health, Ryerson University, Room POD249, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3, Canada, E-mail: dzakus@ 123456ryerson.ca
                Article
                FMCH.2016.0125
                10.15212/FMCH.2016.0125
                Copyright © 2016 Family Medicine and Community Health

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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