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      Glucosinolate metabolites required for an Arabidopsis innate immune response.

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          Abstract

          The perception of pathogen or microbe-associated molecular pattern molecules by plants triggers a basal defense response analogous to animal innate immunity and is defined partly by the deposition of the glucan polymer callose at the cell wall at the site of pathogen contact. Transcriptional and metabolic profiling in Arabidopsis mutants, coupled with the monitoring of pathogen-triggered callose deposition, have identified major roles in pathogen response for the plant hormone ethylene and the secondary metabolite 4-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate. Two genes, PEN2 and PEN3, are also necessary for resistance to pathogens and are required for both callose deposition and glucosinolate activation, suggesting that the pathogen-triggered callose response is required for resistance to microbial pathogens. Our study shows that well-studied plant metabolites, previously identified as important in avoiding damage by herbivores, are also required as a component of the plant defense response against microbial pathogens.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Science
          Science (New York, N.Y.)
          American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
          1095-9203
          0036-8075
          Jan 02 2009
          : 323
          : 5910
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
          Article
          1164627 NIHMS78738
          10.1126/science.1164627
          2630859
          19095898
          74b85f48-6b47-4a93-b5cc-475c95f546a3
          History

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