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      Effect of sodium on amiloride- and triamterene-induced current fluctuations in isolated frog skin

      The Journal of General Physiology

      The Rockefeller University Press

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          Abstract

          The apparent association constants of two agents, amiloride and triamterene, that block the Na-selective channel of apical membrane of frog skin are shown to decrease as the Na concentration is increased in the apical bathing solution in isolated skin of the frog, Rana temporaria, Rana esculenta, and Rana pipiens. These results were obtained in "normally polarized" skins. These effects were independent of the anion used (chloride or methylsulfate) or the cation used as the Na substitute (Tris, DDA, or K ion). When NaCl was replaced with mannitol, the Na effect on the amiloride association rate constant persisted, which shows that ionic strength was not critically involved. The amiloride corner frequency was unaffected when the clamp potential was altered from +100 to -60 mV. The Na dependence was greatly attenuated or absent when the serosal surface was bathed in 120 mM K Ringer's, an effect that appears to be attributable to some pharmacological effect of high serosal K. A previously described three- state model is used to analyze the inhibitory effect of Na on the blocker association rate constant.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Gen Physiol
          The Journal of General Physiology
          The Rockefeller University Press
          0022-1295
          1540-7748
          1 March 1986
          : 87
          : 3
          : 425-442
          Article
          86170384
          2217608
          2420917
          Categories
          Articles

          Anatomy & Physiology

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