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      Negative attention bias and processing deficits during the cognitive reappraisal of unpleasant emotions in HIV+ women.

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          Abstract

          Deficits in emotional processing may be attributed to HIV disease or comorbid psychiatric disorders. Electrocortical markers of emotional attention, i.e., amplitude of the P2 and late positive potential (LPP), were compared between 26 HIV+ women and 25 healthy controls during an emotional regulation paradigm. HIV+ women showed early attention bias to negative stimuli indexed by greater P2 amplitude. In contrast, compared with the passive viewing of unpleasant images, HIV+ women demonstrated attenuation of the early and late LPP during positive reappraisal. This interaction remained significant after adjusting for individual differences in apathy, anxiety, and depression. Post hoc analyses implicated time since HIV diagnosis with LPP attenuation during positive reappraisal. Advancing HIV disease may disrupt neural generators associated with the cognitive reappraisal of emotions independent of psychiatric function.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci
          The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences
          American Psychiatric Association Publishing
          1545-7222
          0895-0172
          2015
          : 27
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] From the Dept. of Health Psychology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (RCM); the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, FL (JLT); the Comprehensive Family AIDS Program, Children's Diagnostic and Treatment Center, Fort Lauderdale, FL (SW); and the Dept. of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University, Davie, FL (MR).
          10.1176/appi.neuropsych.13090222
          25541865

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