Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Cestrum nocturnum Flower Extracts Attenuate Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis in Malignant Cells through Inducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Topoisomerase II Activity

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Most of the existing chemotherapeutic drugs have plenty of side effects. Chinese herbal medicine has been used for pharmaceutical and dietary therapy for thousands of years with more effective and fewer side effects. Cestrum nocturnum (CN) has long been used to treat digestive diseases for centuries in China. Our previous study first proved that the n-butanol part isolated from the flowers of CN produced an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of malignant cells. However, the fractions responsible for the antiproliferation effect of n-butanol part from CN flowers and related mechanisms remain unknown. Thus, in this study, we extracted fractions C4 and C5 from n-butanol part of CN flowers and investigated their immune toxicity and antitumor activities. It was found that fractions C4 and C5 exhibited great cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines but had low immune toxicity towards T and B lymphocytes in vitro. The tested fractions also attenuated proliferation and induced apoptosis at G 0/G 1 and G 2/M phases in Bel-7404 cells through inducing DNA damage and inhibiting topoisomerase II relaxation activity. These results suggest that fractions C4 and C5 may represent important sources of potential antitumor agents due to their pronounced antitumor effects and low immune toxicity.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 19

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Cancer statistics, 2014.

      Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data were collected by the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. A total of 1,665,540 new cancer cases and 585,720 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States in 2014. During the most recent 5 years for which there are data (2006-2010), delay-adjusted cancer incidence rates declined slightly in men (by 0.6% per year) and were stable in women, while cancer death rates decreased by 1.8% per year in men and by 1.4% per year in women. The combined cancer death rate (deaths per 100,000 population) has been continuously declining for 2 decades, from a peak of 215.1 in 1991 to 171.8 in 2010. This 20% decline translates to the avoidance of approximately 1,340,400 cancer deaths (952,700 among men and 387,700 among women) during this time period. The magnitude of the decline in cancer death rates from 1991 to 2010 varies substantially by age, race, and sex, ranging from no decline among white women aged 80 years and older to a 55% decline among black men aged 40 years to 49 years. Notably, black men experienced the largest drop within every 10-year age group. Further progress can be accelerated by applying existing cancer control knowledge across all segments of the population. © 2014 American Cancer Society, Inc.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Programmed cell death pathways in cancer: a review of apoptosis, autophagy and programmed necrosis.

         L Ouyang,  J Bao,  Shuhua Zhao (2012)
        Programmed cell death (PCD), referring to apoptosis, autophagy and programmed necrosis, is proposed to be death of a cell in any pathological format, when mediated by an intracellular program. These three forms of PCD may jointly decide the fate of cells of malignant neoplasms; apoptosis and programmed necrosis invariably contribute to cell death, whereas autophagy can play either pro-survival or pro-death roles. Recent bulk of accumulating evidence has contributed to a wealth of knowledge facilitating better understanding of cancer initiation and progression with the three distinctive types of cell death. To be able to decipher PCD signalling pathways may aid development of new targeted anti-cancer therapeutic strategies. Thus in this review, we present a brief outline of apoptosis, autophagy and programmed necrosis pathways and apoptosis-related microRNA regulation, in cancer. Taken together, understanding PCD and the complex interplay between apoptosis, autophagy and programmed necrosis may ultimately allow scientists and clinicians to harness the three types of PCD for discovery of further novel drug targets, in the future cancer treatment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          DNA damage-induced cell death: from specific DNA lesions to the DNA damage response and apoptosis.

          DNA damaging agents are potent inducers of cell death triggered by apoptosis. Since these agents induce a plethora of different DNA lesions, it is firstly important to identify the specific lesions responsible for initiating apoptosis before the apoptotic executing pathways can be elucidated. Here, we describe specific DNA lesions that have been identified as apoptosis triggers, their repair and the signaling provoked by them. We discuss methylating agents such as temozolomide, ionizing radiation and cisplatin, all of them are important in cancer therapy. We show that the potentially lethal events for the cell are O(6)-methylguanine adducts that are converted by mismatch repair into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), non-repaired N-methylpurines and abasic sites as well as bulky adducts that block DNA replication leading to DSBs that are also directly induced following ionizing radiation. Transcriptional inhibition may also contribute to apoptosis. Cells are equipped with sensors that detect DNA damage and relay the signal via kinases to executors, who on their turn evoke a process that inhibits cell cycle progression and provokes DNA repair or, if this fails, activate the receptor and/or mitochondrial apoptotic cascade. The main DNA damage recognition factors MRN and the PI3 kinases ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which phosphorylate a multitude of proteins and thus induce the DNA damage response (DDR), will be discussed as well as the downstream players p53, NF-κB, Akt and survivin. We review data and models describing the signaling from DNA damage to the apoptosis executing machinery and discuss the complex interplay between cell survival and death. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            1Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Pharmacy School of Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221004, China
            2Department of Pharmacology, Pharmacy School of Xuzhou Medical University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221004, China
            3Faculty of Chinese Medicine Science, Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region 530200, China
            4Department of Science and Technology, Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning, Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region 530200, China
            Author notes
            *Zhen-Guo Zhong: gxtcmuzzg@ 123456163.com

            Academic Editor: Ciara Hughes

            Journal
            Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
            Evid Based Complement Alternat Med
            ECAM
            Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine : eCAM
            Hindawi Publishing Corporation
            1741-427X
            1741-4288
            2017
            31 January 2017
            : 2017
            5307125 10.1155/2017/1456786
            Copyright © 2017 Deng-Pan Wu et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

            Funding
            Funded by: National Natural Science Foundation of China
            Award ID: 81460598
            Award ID: 81402946
            Funded by: Initializing Fund of Xuzhou Medical University
            Award ID: D2014017
            Award ID: D2014010
            Funded by: the Natural Science Research grant of Higher Education of Jiangsu Province
            Award ID: 14KJD310002
            Categories
            Research Article

            Complementary & Alternative medicine

            Comments

            Comment on this article