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      Towards Better Decision Making in Growth Hormone Therapy

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          Abstract

          Controlled clinical trials are not always possible or warranted. Other sources of data include observational studies, meta-analyses, expert opinions, subjective judgements, and mathematical/statistical models developed from large databases. Decision analysis is presented as a preferred methodology for analysis in situations of uncertainty, in combination with cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. Special emphasis is given to quality-of-life considerations in growth hormone (GH) therapy and ways to measure it and express patient preferences.

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          Most cited references 3

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          Inpatient general medicine is evidence based

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            Insurance Coverage, Physician Recommendations, and Access to Emerging Treatments

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              Genetics of Silver-Russell Syndrome

              The Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) is generally sporadic, but with sufficient reported cases of dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance to suggest a genetic cause in some cases, at least. No consistent cytogenetic abnormalities have been found although some features of the syndrome have been reported to be associated with structural abnormalities of distal 15q. More recently it has been shown that about 10% of SRS patients have maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 7 which suggests the presence of a maternally imprinted gene on chromosome 7 that is associated with SRS. In the majority of patients with normal biparental inheritance of chromosome 7 the same gene could be involved if the paternal copy were deleted or mutated so that it is disabled and the maternal copy is silent because of the imprinting.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                HRE
                Horm Res Paediatr
                10.1159/issn.1663-2818
                Hormone Research in Paediatrics
                S. Karger AG
                978-3-8055-6898-2
                978-3-318-00450-2
                1663-2818
                1663-2826
                1999
                June 1999
                17 November 2004
                : 51
                : Suppl 1
                : 30-35
                Affiliations
                Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel, and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass., USA
                Article
                53133 Horm Res 1999;51(suppl 1):30–35
                10.1159/000053133
                10393489
                © 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                Page count
                References: 13, Pages: 6
                Categories
                Evidence-Based Medicine

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