34
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Can we really reduce ethnic prejudice outside the lab? A meta-analysis of direct and indirect contact interventions : Meta-analysis of contact interventions

      ,
      European Journal of Social Psychology
      Wiley-Blackwell

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references62

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book Chapter: not found

          An integrative theory of intergroup contact

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Synthesizing standardized mean-change measures

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Does contact reduce prejudice or does prejudice reduce contact? A longitudinal test of the contact hypothesis among majority and minority groups in three European countries.

              A widely researched panacea for reducing intergroup prejudice is the contact hypothesis. However, few longitudinal studies can shed light on the direction of causal processes: from contact to prejudice reduction (contact effects) or from prejudice to contact reduction (prejudice effects). The authors conducted a longitudinal field survey in Germany, Belgium, and England with school students. The sample comprised members of both ethnic minorities (n = 512) and ethnic majorities (n = 1,143). Path analyses yielded both lagged contact effects and prejudice effects: Contact reduced prejudice, but prejudice also reduced contact. Furthermore, contact effects were negligible for minority members. These effects were obtained for 2 indicators of prejudice: negative intergroup emotions and desire for social distance. For both majority and minority members, contact effects on negative emotions were stronger when outgroup contacts were perceived as being typical of their group. Contact effects were also mediated by intergroup anxiety. This mediating mechanism was impaired for minority members because of a weakened effect of anxiety on desire for social distance. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                European Journal of Social Psychology
                Eur. J. Soc. Psychol.
                Wiley-Blackwell
                00462772
                March 2015
                March 2015
                : 45
                : 2
                : 152-168
                Article
                10.1002/ejsp.2079
                75f6b809-21fd-4ae0-876f-6a484a961a95
                © 2015

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article