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      Novel \(p\)-wave superfluids of fermionic polar molecules

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          Abstract

          We show that recently suggested subwavelength lattices offer remarkable prospects for the observation of novel superfluids of fermionic polar molecules. It becomes realistic to obtain a topological \(p\)-wave superfluid of microwave-dressed polar molecules in 2D lattices at temperatures of the order of tens of nanokelvins, which is promising for topologically protected quantum information processing. Another foreseen novel phase is an interlayer \(p\)-wave superfluid of polar molecules in a bilayer geometry.

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          Most cited references 29

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          A High Phase-Space-Density Gas of Polar Molecules

          A quantum gas of ultracold polar molecules, with long-range and anisotropic interactions, would not only enable explorations of a large class of many-body physics phenomena, but could also be used for quantum information processing. We report on the creation of an ultracold dense gas of 40K87Rb polar molecules. Using a single step of STIRAP (STImulated Raman Adiabatic Passage) via two-frequency laser irradiation, we coherently transfer extremely weakly bound KRb molecules to the rovibrational ground state of either the triplet or the singlet electronic ground molecular potential. The polar molecular gas has a peak density of 10^12 cm^-3, and an expansion-determined translational temperature of 350 nK. The polar molecules have a permanent electric dipole moment, which we measure via Stark spectroscopy to be 0.052(2) Debye for the triplet rovibrational ground state and 0.566(17) Debye for the singlet rovibrational ground state. (1 Debye= 3.336*10^-30 C m)
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            Vortices and Superfluidity in a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

            Quantum-degenerate Fermi gases provide a remarkable opportunity to study strongly interacting fermions. In contrast to other Fermi systems, such as superconductors, neutron stars or the quark-gluon plasma, these gases have low densities and their interactions can be precisely controlled over an enormous range. Here we report observations of vortices in such a gas that provide definitive evidence for superfluidity. By varying the pairing strength between two fermions near a Feshbach resonance, one can explore the crossover from a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of molecules to a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluid of loosely bound pairs whose size is comparable to, or even larger than, the interparticle spacing. The crossover realizes a novel form of high-T_C superfluidity and it may provide new insight for high-T_C superconductors. Previous experiments with Fermi gases have revealed condensation of fermion pairs. While these and other studies were consistent with predictions assuming superfluidity, the smoking gun for superfluid behavior has been elusive. Our observation of vortex lattices directly displays superfluid flow in a strongly interacting, rotating Fermi gas.
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              Coupling a single trapped atom to a nanoscale optical cavity.

              Hybrid quantum devices, in which dissimilar quantum systems are combined in order to attain qualities not available with either system alone, may enable far-reaching control in quantum measurement, sensing, and information processing. A paradigmatic example is trapped ultracold atoms, which offer excellent quantum coherent properties, coupled to nanoscale solid-state systems, which allow for strong interactions. We demonstrate a deterministic interface between a single trapped rubidium atom and a nanoscale photonic crystal cavity. Precise control over the atom's position allows us to probe the cavity near-field with a resolution below the diffraction limit and to observe large atom-photon coupling. This approach may enable the realization of integrated, strongly coupled quantum nano-optical circuits.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2016-01-12
                Article
                10.1038/srep27448
                1601.03026

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                9 pages, 3 figures
                cond-mat.quant-gas

                Quantum gases & Cold atoms

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