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Teaching Life-Saving Manoeuvres in Primary School

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      Abstract

      Introduction. In the event of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) early intervention provided by a layperson can be life-saving. Teaching first aid in primary school may increase the lifelong ability and motivation of young people to take action in an emergency. Objective. The aim of this article is to report a training experience on BLSD (Basic Life Support and Defibrillation) designed for a group of pupils in an Italian primary school, with assessment of its effectiveness at a distance. Methods. The assessment was carried out using a multiple choice questionnaire on a sample of 130 pupils aged 11-12, 62 trained in BLSD and 68 as a control group. The trained group also performed an emergency simulation to assess their learning of practical skills. Results. Using the t test, significant differences emerged in the questionnaire scores between the case-control group. The results of the skill test were positive, even for the most difficult manoeuvres such as opening airways, assessing breathing, or using an AED (Automated External Defibrillator). Conclusion. Although there are still some open questions regarding the ability to retain these skills in the medium/long term, the study shows that life-saving manoeuvres can be effectively taught to primary school pupils.

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      Most cited references 20

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      European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2010 Section 1. Executive summary.

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        Public use of automated external defibrillators.

        Automated external defibrillators save lives when they are used by designated personnel in certain public settings. We performed a two-year prospective study at three Chicago airports to assess whether random bystanders witnessing out-of-hospital cardiac arrests would retrieve and successfully use automated external defibrillators. Defibrillators were installed a brisk 60-to-90-second walk apart throughout passenger terminals at O'Hare, Midway, and Meigs Field airports, which together serve more than 100 million passengers per year. The use of defibrillators was promoted by public-service videos in waiting areas, pamphlets, and reports in the media. We assessed the time from notification of the dispatchers to defibrillation, survival rate at 72 hours and at one year among persons with cardiac arrest, their neurologic status, and the characteristics of rescuers. Over a two-year period, 21 persons had nontraumatic cardiac arrest, 18 of whom had ventricular fibrillation. With two exceptions, defibrillator operators were good Samaritans, acting voluntarily. In the case of four patients with ventricular fibrillation, defibrillators were neither nearby nor used within five minutes, and none of these patients survived. Three others remained in fibrillation and eventually died, despite the rapid use of a defibrillator (within five minutes). Eleven patients with ventricular fibrillation were successfully resuscitated, including eight who regained consciousness before hospital admission. No shock was delivered in four cases of suspected cardiac arrest, and the device correctly indicated that the problem was not due to ventricular fibrillation. The rescuers of 6 of the 11 successfully resuscitated patients had no training or experience in the use of automated defibrillators, although 3 had medical degrees. Ten of the 18 patients with ventricular fibrillation were alive and neurologically intact at one year. Automated external defibrillators deployed in readily accessible, well-marked public areas in Chicago airports were used effectively to assist patients with cardiac arrest. In the cases of survivors, most of the users had no duty to act and no prior training in the use of these devices. Copyright 2002 Massachusetts Medical Society
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          Importance and implementation of training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillation in schools: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.

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            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            INAIL, Italian Workers' Compensation Authority, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, Via Fontana Candida 1, Monte Porzio Catone, 00078 Rome, Italy
            Author notes
            *Giovanna Cangiano: g.cangiano@ 123456inail.it

            Academic Editor: Aristomenis K. Exadaktylos

            Journal
            Biomed Res Int
            Biomed Res Int
            BMRI
            BioMed Research International
            Hindawi Publishing Corporation
            2314-6133
            2314-6141
            2016
            13 November 2016
            : 2016
            27957491
            5124447
            10.1155/2016/2647235
            Copyright © 2016 Sara Calicchia et al.

            This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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            Research Article

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