Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Shift Work in Nurses: Contribution of Phenotypes and Genotypes to Adaptation

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Background

      Daily cycles of sleep/wake, hormones, and physiological processes are often misaligned with behavioral patterns during shift work, leading to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular/metabolic/gastrointestinal disorders, some types of cancer, and mental disorders including depression and anxiety. It is unclear how sleep timing, chronotype, and circadian clock gene variation contribute to adaptation to shift work.

      Methods

      Newly defined sleep strategies, chronotype, and genotype for polymorphisms in circadian clock genes were assessed in 388 hospital day- and night-shift nurses.

      Results

      Night-shift nurses who used sleep deprivation as a means to switch to and from diurnal sleep on work days (∼25%) were the most poorly adapted to their work schedule. Chronotype also influenced efficacy of adaptation. In addition, polymorphisms in CLOCK, NPAS2, PER2, and PER3 were significantly associated with outcomes such as alcohol/caffeine consumption and sleepiness, as well as sleep phase, inertia and duration in both single- and multi-locus models. Many of these results were specific to shift type suggesting an interaction between genotype and environment (in this case, shift work).

      Conclusions

      Sleep strategy, chronotype, and genotype contribute to the adaptation of the circadian system to an environment that switches frequently and/or irregularly between different schedules of the light-dark cycle and social/workplace time. This study of shift work nurses illustrates how an environmental “stress” to the temporal organization of physiology and metabolism can have behavioral and health-related consequences. Because nurses are a key component of health care, these findings could have important implications for health-care policy.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 75

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Influence of life stress on depression: moderation by a polymorphism in the 5-HTT gene.

      In a prospective-longitudinal study of a representative birth cohort, we tested why stressful experiences lead to depression in some people but not in others. A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HT T) gene was found to moderate the influence of stressful life events on depression. Individuals with one or two copies of the short allele of the 5-HT T promoter polymorphism exhibited more depressive symptoms, diagnosable depression, and suicidality in relation to stressful life events than individuals homozygous for the long allele. This epidemiological study thus provides evidence of a gene-by-environment interaction, in which an individual's response to environmental insults is moderated by his or her genetic makeup.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: found
        • Article: not found

        Adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of circadian misalignment.

        There is considerable epidemiological evidence that shift work is associated with increased risk for obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, perhaps the result of physiologic maladaptation to chronically sleeping and eating at abnormal circadian times. To begin to understand underlying mechanisms, we determined the effects of such misalignment between behavioral cycles (fasting/feeding and sleep/wake cycles) and endogenous circadian cycles on metabolic, autonomic, and endocrine predictors of obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk. Ten adults (5 female) underwent a 10-day laboratory protocol, wherein subjects ate and slept at all phases of the circadian cycle-achieved by scheduling a recurring 28-h "day." Subjects ate 4 isocaloric meals each 28-h "day." For 8 days, plasma leptin, insulin, glucose, and cortisol were measured hourly, urinary catecholamines 2 hourly (totaling approximately 1,000 assays/subject), and blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac vagal modulation, oxygen consumption, respiratory exchange ratio, and polysomnographic sleep daily. Core body temperature was recorded continuously for 10 days to assess circadian phase. Circadian misalignment, when subjects ate and slept approximately 12 h out of phase from their habitual times, systematically decreased leptin (-17%, P < 0.001), increased glucose (+6%, P < 0.001) despite increased insulin (+22%, P = 0.006), completely reversed the daily cortisol rhythm (P < 0.001), increased mean arterial pressure (+3%, P = 0.001), and reduced sleep efficiency (-20%, P < 0.002). Notably, circadian misalignment caused 3 of 8 subjects (with sufficient available data) to exhibit postprandial glucose responses in the range typical of a prediabetic state. These findings demonstrate the adverse cardiometabolic implications of circadian misalignment, as occurs acutely with jet lag and chronically with shift work.
          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The genetics of mammalian circadian order and disorder: implications for physiology and disease.

          Circadian cycles affect a variety of physiological processes, and disruptions of normal circadian biology therefore have the potential to influence a range of disease-related pathways. The genetic basis of circadian rhythms is well studied in model organisms and, more recently, studies of the genetic basis of circadian disorders has confirmed the conservation of key players in circadian biology from invertebrates to humans. In addition, important advances have been made in understanding how these molecules influence physiological functions in tissues throughout the body. Together, these studies set the scene for applying our knowledge of circadian biology to the understanding and treatment of a range of human diseases, including cancer and metabolic and behavioural disorders.
            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            [1 ]Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America
            [2 ]Department of Statistics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America
            [3 ]Neuroscience Graduate Program, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America
            [4 ]Vanderbilt School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America
            [5 ]Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C., United States of America
            University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, United States of America
            Author notes

            Conceived and designed the experiments: KLG AAM-R AH HMB SVS CMC SR JH NW MLS DGM CHJ. Performed the experiments: KLG AH HMB SVS CMC SR JH KC NH NW. Analyzed the data: KLG AAM-R AH HMB SVS CMC SR MLS CHJ. Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: KLG AAM-R MLS. Wrote the paper: KLG AAM-R CHJ.

            [¤]

            Current address: Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurobiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America

            Contributors
            Role: Editor
            Journal
            PLoS One
            plos
            plosone
            PLoS ONE
            Public Library of Science (San Francisco, USA )
            1932-6203
            2011
            13 April 2011
            : 6
            : 4
            3076422
            21533241
            PONE-D-10-04290
            10.1371/journal.pone.0018395
            (Editor)
            Gamble et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
            Counts
            Pages: 12
            Categories
            Research Article
            Biology
            Genetics
            Human Genetics
            Molecular Genetics
            Medicine
            Anatomy and Physiology
            Physiological Processes
            Chronobiology
            Clinical Genetics
            Neurology
            Sleep Disorders
            Non-Clinical Medicine
            Health Care Providers
            Nurses
            Public Health
            Occupational and Industrial Health

            Uncategorized

            Comments

            Comment on this article