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      Teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching in student-centred medical curricula: the impact of context and personal characteristics

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          Abstract

          Background

          Gibbs and Coffey (2004) have reported that teaching practices are influenced by teachers’ conceptions of learning and teaching. In our previous research we found significant differences between teachers’ conceptions in two medical schools with student-centred education. Medical school was the most important predictor, next to discipline, gender and teaching experience. Our research questions for the current study are (1) which specific elements of medical school explain the effect of medical school on teachers' conceptions of learning and teaching? How? and (2) which contextual and personal characteristics are related to conceptions of learning and teaching? How?

          Methods

          Individual interviews were conducted with 13 teachers of the undergraduate curricula in two medical schools. Previously their conceptions of learning and teaching were assessed with the COLT questionnaire. We investigated the meanings they attached to context and personal characteristics, in relation to their conceptions of learning and teaching. We used a template analysis.

          Results

          Large individual differences existed between teachers. Characteristics mentioned at the medical school and curriculum level were ‘curriculum tradition’, ‘support by educational department’ and ‘management and finances’. Other contextual characteristics were ‘leadership style’ at all levels but especially of department chairs, ‘affordances and support’, ‘support and relatedness’, and ‘students’ characteristics’. Personal characteristics were ‘agency’, ‘experience with PBL (as a student or a teacher)’,’personal development’, ‘motivation and work engagement’and ‘high content expertise’.

          Conclusion

          Several context and personal characteristics associated with teachers’ conceptions were identified, enabling a broader view on faculty development with attention for these characteristics, next to teaching skills.

          Electronic supplementary material

          The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12909-016-0767-1) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

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          Most cited references 44

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          Job demands, job resources, and their relationship with burnout and engagement: a multi-sample study

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            Teachers' Beliefs and Educational Research: Cleaning Up a Messy Construct

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              Reciprocal relationships between job resources, personal resources, and work engagement

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (0031) 204445129 , a.jacobs@vumc.nl
                sj.van.luijk@mumc.nl
                c.vandervleuten@maastrichtuniversity.nl
                r.kusurkar@vumc.nl
                g.croiset@vumc.nl
                f.scheele@olvg.nl
                Journal
                BMC Med Educ
                BMC Med Educ
                BMC Medical Education
                BioMed Central (London )
                1472-6920
                21 September 2016
                21 September 2016
                2016
                : 16
                Affiliations
                [1 ]VUmc School of Medical Sciences , Amsterdam & LEARN! Faculty of Psychology and Education, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                [2 ]Maastricht University Medical Center +, Maastricht, The Netherlands
                [3 ]Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands
                [4 ]VUmc School of Medical Sciences, VU University Medical Center & LEARN! Faculty of Psychology and Education, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                [5 ]VU University and OLVG-West Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
                767
                10.1186/s12909-016-0767-1
                5031323
                27653777
                © The Author(s). 2016

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Funding
                Funded by: not applicable
                Categories
                Research Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2016

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