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      Leveraging Wisdom of the Crowd for Decision Support

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      Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference (HCI)

      Fusion

      11 - 15 July 2016

      Decision Support Systems, evaluation, crowdsourcing, wisdom of the crowd

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          Abstract

          While Decision Support Systems (DSS) have a long history, their usefulness for non-experts outside specific organisations has not lived up to the promise. A key reason for this is the high cost associated with populating the underlying knowledge bases. In this article, we describe how DSSs can leverage crowds and their wisdom in constructing knowledge bases to overcome this challenge. We also demonstrate how to construct DSSs on-the-fly using the collected data. Our user-driven laboratory studies focus on user perceptions of the concept itself, and motives for contributing and using such a DSS. To the best of our knowledge, our approach and implementation are the first to demonstrate such use of crowdsourcing in building DSSs.

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          Most cited references 57

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          Experimental study of inequality and unpredictability in an artificial cultural market.

          Hit songs, books, and movies are many times more successful than average, suggesting that "the best" alternatives are qualitatively different from "the rest"; yet experts routinely fail to predict which products will succeed. We investigated this paradox experimentally, by creating an artificial "music market" in which 14,341 participants downloaded previously unknown songs either with or without knowledge of previous participants' choices. Increasing the strength of social influence increased both inequality and unpredictability of success. Success was also only partly determined by quality: The best songs rarely did poorly, and the worst rarely did well, but any other result was possible.
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            An Empirical Evaluation of the System Usability Scale

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              The Hawthorne Effect: a randomised, controlled trial

              Background The 'Hawthorne Effect' may be an important factor affecting the generalisability of clinical research to routine practice, but has been little studied. Hawthorne Effects have been reported in previous clinical trials in dementia but to our knowledge, no attempt has been made to quantify them. Our aim was to compare minimal follow-up to intensive follow-up in participants in a placebo controlled trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia. Methods Participants in a dementia trial were randomised to intensive follow-up (with comprehensive assessment visits at baseline and two, four and six months post randomisation) or minimal follow-up (with an abbreviated assessment at baseline and a full assessment at six months). Our primary outcomes were cognitive functioning (ADAS-Cog) and participant and carer-rated quality of life (QOL-AD). Results We recruited 176 participants, mainly through general practices. The main analysis was based on Intention to treat (ITT), with available data. In the ANCOVA model with baseline score as a co-variate, follow-up group had a significant effect on outcome at six months on the ADAS-Cog score (n = 140; mean difference = -2.018; 95%CI -3.914, -0.121; p = 0.037 favouring the intensive follow-up group), and on participant-rated quality of life score (n = 142; mean difference = -1.382; 95%CI -2.642, -0.122; p = 0.032 favouring minimal follow-up group). There was no significant difference on carer quality of life. Conclusion We found that more intensive follow-up of individuals in a placebo-controlled clinical trial of Ginkgo biloba for treating mild-moderate dementia resulted in a better outcome than minimal follow-up, as measured by their cognitive functioning. Trial registration Current controlled trials: ISRCTN45577048
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Conference
                July 2016
                July 2016
                : 1-12
                Affiliations
                University of Oulu

                Pentti Kaiteran katu 1

                90570 Oulu, Finland
                10.14236/ewic/HCI2016.38
                © Hosio et al. Published by BCS Learning and Development Ltd. Proceedings of British HCI 2016 Conference Fusion, Bournemouth, UK

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

                Proceedings of the 30th International BCS Human Computer Interaction Conference
                HCI
                30
                Bournemouth University, Poole, UK
                11 - 15 July 2016
                Electronic Workshops in Computing (eWiC)
                Fusion
                Product
                Product Information: 1477-9358 BCS Learning & Development
                Self URI (journal page): https://ewic.bcs.org/
                Categories
                Electronic Workshops in Computing

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