Blog
About

8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Design of a microfluidic device to quantify dynamic intra-nuclear deformation during cell migration through confining environments

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Quantitative measurements of subcellular deformation in microfabricated environments provide an improved understanding of how cells overcome the resistance of the large and rigid nucleus during 3-D migration, with direct relevance to invasive cancer cells and immune cells.

          Abstract

          The ability of cells to migrate through tissues and interstitial spaces is an essential factor during development and tissue homeostasis, immune cell mobility, and in various human diseases. Deformation of the nucleus and its associated lamina during 3-D migration is gathering increasing interest in the context of cancer metastasis, with the underlying hypothesis that a softer nucleus, resulting from reduced levels of lamin A/C, may aid tumour spreading. However, current methods to study the migration of cells in confining three dimensional (3-D) environments are limited by their imprecise control over the confinement, physiological relevance, and/or compatibility with high resolution imaging techniques. We describe the design of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device composed of channels with precisely-defined constrictions mimicking physiological environments that enable high resolution imaging of live and fixed cells. The device promotes easy cell loading and rapid, yet long-lasting (>24 hours) chemotactic gradient formation without the need for continuous perfusion. Using this device, we obtained detailed, quantitative measurements of dynamic nuclear deformation as cells migrate through tight spaces, revealing distinct phases of nuclear translocation through the constriction, buckling of the nuclear lamina, and severe intranuclear strain. Furthermore, we found that lamin A/C-deficient cells exhibited increased and more plastic nuclear deformations compared to wild-type cells but only minimal changes in nuclear volume, implying that low lamin A/C levels facilitate migration through constrictions by increasing nuclear deformability rather than compressibility. The integration of our migration devices with high resolution time-lapse imaging provides a powerful new approach to study intracellular mechanics and dynamics in a variety of physiologically-relevant applications, ranging from cancer cell invasion to immune cell recruitment.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Nuclear mechanics during cell migration.

          During cell migration, the movement of the nucleus must be coordinated with the cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge and trailing end, and, as a result, undergoes complex changes in position and shape, which in turn affects cell polarity, shape, and migration efficiency. We here describe the steps of nuclear positioning and deformation during cell polarization and migration, focusing on migration through three-dimensional matrices. We discuss molecular components that govern nuclear shape and stiffness, and review how nuclear dynamics are connected to and controlled by the actin, tubulin and intermediate cytoskeleton-based migration machinery and how this regulation is altered in pathological conditions. Understanding the regulation of nuclear biomechanics has important implications for cell migration during tissue regeneration, immune defence and cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Matrix geometry determines optimal cancer cell migration strategy and modulates response to interventions.

            The molecular requirements and morphology of migrating cells can vary depending on matrix geometry; therefore, predicting the optimal migration strategy or the effect of experimental perturbation is difficult. We present a model of cell motility that encompasses actin-polymerization-based protrusions, actomyosin contractility, variable actin-plasma membrane linkage leading to membrane blebbing, cell-extracellular-matrix adhesion and varying extracellular matrix geometries. This is used to explore the theoretical requirements for rapid migration in different matrix geometries. Confined matrix geometries cause profound shifts in the relationship of adhesion and contractility to cell velocity; indeed, cell-matrix adhesion is dispensable for migration in discontinuous confined environments. The model is challenged to predict the effect of different combinations of kinase inhibitors and integrin depletion in vivo, and in confined matrices based on in vitro two-dimensional measurements. Intravital imaging is used to verify bleb-driven migration at tumour margins, and the predicted response to single and combinatorial manipulations.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              At the leading edge of three-dimensional cell migration.

              Cells migrating on flat two-dimensional (2D) surfaces use actin polymerization to extend the leading edge of the plasma membrane during lamellipodia-based migration. This mode of migration is not universal; it represents only one of several mechanisms of cell motility in three-dimensional (3D) environments. The distinct modes of 3D migration are strongly dependent on the physical properties of the extracellular matrix, and they can be distinguished by the structure of the leading edge and the degree of matrix adhesion. How are these distinct modes of cell motility in 3D environments related to each other and regulated? Recent studies show that the same type of cell migrating in 3D extracellular matrix can switch between different leading edge structures. This mode-switching behavior, or plasticity, by a single cell suggests that the apparent diversity of motility mechanisms is integrated by a common intracellular signaling pathway that governs the mode of cell migration. In this Commentary, we propose that the mode of 3D cell migration is governed by a signaling axis involving cell-matrix adhesions, RhoA signaling and actomyosin contractility, and that this might represent a universal mechanism that controls 3D cell migration.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                IBNIEK
                Integrative Biology
                Integr. Biol.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1757-9694
                1757-9708
                2015
                2015
                : 7
                : 12
                : 1534-1546
                Article
                10.1039/C5IB00200A
                4666765
                26549481
                © 2015
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=C5IB00200A

                Comments

                Comment on this article