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      Rapid Biofilm Eradication on Bone Implants Using Red Phosphorus and Near-Infrared Light

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          Abstract

          Bone-implant-associated infections are common after orthopedic surgery due to impaired host immune response around the implants. In particular, when a biofilm develops, the immune system and antibiotic treatment find it difficult to eradicate, which sometimes requires a second operation to replace the infected implants. Most strategies have been designed to prevent biofilms from forming on the surface of bone implants, but these strategies cannot eliminate the biofilm when it has been established in vivo. To address this issue, a nonsurgical, noninvasive treatment for biofilm infection must be developed. Herein, a red-phosphorus-IR780-arginine-glycine-aspartic-acid-cysteine coating on titanium bone implants is prepared. The red phosphorus has great biocompatibility and exhibits efficient photothermal ability. The temperature sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm is enhanced in the presence of singlet oxygen (1 O2 ) produced by IR780. Without damaging the normal tissue, the biofilm can be eradicated through a safe near-infrared (808 nm) photothermal therapy at 50 °C in vitro and in vivo. This approach reaches an antibacterial efficiency of 96.2% in vivo with 10 min of irradiation at 50 °C. Meanwhile, arginine-glycine-aspartic-acid-cysteine decorated on the surface of the implant can improve the cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation.

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          Most cited references 37

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          A clearer vision for in vivo imaging.

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            Ti based biomaterials, the ultimate choice for orthopaedic implants – A review

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              Non-invasive neuroimaging using near-infrared light.

              This article reviews diffuse optical brain imaging, a technique that employs near-infrared light to non-invasively probe the brain for changes in parameters relating to brain function. We describe the general methodology, including types of measurements and instrumentation (including the tradeoffs inherent in the various instrument components), and the basic theory required to interpret the recorded data. A brief review of diffuse optical applications is included, with an emphasis on research that has been done with psychiatric populations. Finally, we discuss some practical issues and limitations that are relevant when conducting diffuse optical experiments. We find that, while diffuse optics can provide substantial advantages to the psychiatric researcher relative to the alternative brain imaging methods, the method remains substantially underutilized in this field.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advanced Materials
                Adv. Mater.
                Wiley
                09359648
                August 2018
                August 2018
                June 19 2018
                : 30
                : 31
                : 1801808
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials; Ministry-of-Education Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials; Hubei Key Laboratory of Polymer Materials; School of Materials Science & Engineering; Hubei University; Wuhan 430062 China
                [2 ]School of Materials Science & Engineering; Tianjin University; Tianjin 300072 China
                [3 ]State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System and Department of Materials Science and Engineering; College of Engineering; Peking University; Beijing 100871 China
                [4 ]Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology; Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine; The University of Hong Kong; Pokfulam Hong Kong 999077 China
                [5 ]Center for Human Tissues and Organs Degeneration; Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology; Chinese Academy of Sciences; Shenzhen 518055 China
                Article
                10.1002/adma.201801808
                29923229
                © 2018

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

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