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      Effects of salinity and adult extract on settlement of the oligohaline barnacle Balanus subalbidus

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      Marine Biology

      Springer Science and Business Media LLC

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          Most cited references 36

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          Recruitment dynamics in complex life cycles.

          Organisms living in the marine rocky intertidal zone compete for space. This, together with predation, physical disruption, and differing species tolerances to physiological stress, explains the structure of the ecological communities at some sites. At other sites the supply of larvae is limiting, and events in the offshore waters, such as wind-driven upwelling, explain the composition of intertidal communities. Whether the community ecology at a site is governed by adult-adult interactions within the site, or by limitations to the supply of larvae reaching the site, is determined by the regional pattern of circulation in the coastal waters. Models combining larval circulation with adult interactions can potentially forecast population fluctuations. These findings illustrate how processes in different ecological habitats are coupled.
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            The consequences of variation in initial settlement vs. post-settlement mortality in rocky intertidal communities

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              Supply-side ecology and benthic marine assemblages.

              Many marine invertebrates have a planktonic stage of their life history during which widespread dispersal and much mortality occur. The numbers surviving to recruit into habitats occupied by adults are therefore very variable in time and space. Models for the structure and dynamics of benthic assemblages tend to focus on processes causing death - often assuming consistent arrivals of recruits. Supply-side ecology is a newly fashionable term to describe recent interest in the long-realized consequences of variations in recruitment. Such variations have important influences on theory and empirical research in these assemblages. Copyright © 1989. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Marine Biology
                Marine Bioliogy
                Springer Science and Business Media LLC
                0025-3162
                1432-1793
                June 1994
                June 1994
                : 119
                : 3
                : 423-430
                Article
                10.1007/BF00347539
                © 1994

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