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      Pinning effects on self-heating and flux-flow instability in superconducting films near \(T_{c}\)

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          Abstract

          The effect of pinning on self-heating triggering the Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) flux-flow instability (FFI) in superconducting thin films is theoretically investigated. The problem is considered relying upon the Bezuglyj-Shklovskij (BS) generalization of the LO theory, accounting for a finite heat removal from the quasiparticles at temperature \(T^\ast\) to the bath at temperature \(T_0\). The FFI critical parameters, namely the current density \(j^{\ast}\), the electric field \(E^{\ast}\), the power density \(P^{\ast}\), and the vortex velocity \(v^{\ast}\) are calculated and graphically analyzed as functions of the magnetic field and the pinning strength. With increasing pinning strength at a fixed magnetic field value \(E^{\ast}\) \emph{decreases}, \(j^{\ast}\) \emph{increases}, while \(P^{\ast}\) and \(T^{\ast}\) \emph{remain practically constant}. Vortex pinning may hence be the cause for eventual discrepancies between experiments on superconductors with \emph{strong pinning} and the generalized LO and BS results.

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          Dynamic Melting of the Vortex Lattice

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            Rearrangement of the vortex lattice due to instabilities of vortex flow

            With increasing applied current we show that the moving vortex lattice changes its structure from a triangular one to a set of parallel vortex rows in a pinning free superconductor. This effect originates from the change of the shape of the vortex core due to non-equilibrium effects (similar to the mechanism of vortex motion instability in the Larkin-Ovchinnikov theory). The moving vortex creates a deficit of quasiparticles in front of its motion and an excess of quasiparticles behind the core of the moving vortex. This results in the appearance of a wake (region with suppressed order parameter) behind the vortex which attracts other vortices resulting in an effective direction-dependent interaction between vortices. When the vortex velocity \(v\) reaches the critical value \(v_c\) quasi-phase slip lines (lines with fast vortex motion) appear which may coexist with slowly moving vortices between such lines. Our results are found within the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau equations and are strictly valid when the coherence length \(\xi(T)\) is larger or comparable with the decay length \(L_{in}\) of the non-equilibrium quasiparticle distribution function. We qualitatively explain experiments on the instability of vortex flow at low magnetic fields when the distance between vortices \(a \gg L_{in} \gg \xi (T)\). We speculate that a similar instability of the vortex lattice should exist for \(v>v_c\) even when \(a
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              Flux-flow instability and its anisotropy inBi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δsuperconducting films

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2017-04-30
                Article
                1705.00363

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                8 pages, 3 figures
                cond-mat.supr-con

                Condensed matter

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