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      Correction: Jood, P. and Ohta, M. Hierarchical Architecturing for Layered Thermoelectric Sulfides and Chalcogenides. Materials 2015, 8, 1124–1149

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          Abstract

          The authors wish to make the following corrections to this paper [1]. The authors regret that the lattice thermal conductivity (κ at) values of some samples in Table 1 and thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) values of some samples in Table 2 were not correct. The tables with correct κ lat and ZT values are shown below. The authors would like to apologize for any inconvenience caused. materials-08-05315-t001_Table 1 Table 1 Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical resistivity (ρ), carrier mobility (μ), power factor (S 2/ρ), lattice thermal conductivity (κ lat), and thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) at room temperature in the in-plane (ab-plane) and out-of-plane (c-axis) directions for a single crystal of nearly stoichiometric TiS2 [2] and polycrystalline Ti1.008S2 [3]. Sample Direction S (μV·K−1) ρ (μΩ m) μ (cm2·V−1·s−1) S 2/ρ (μW·K−2·m−1) κ lat (W·K−1·m−1) ZT Single crystal In-plane −251 17 15 3710 6.35 0.16 Single crystal Out-of-plane - 13,000 0.017 - 4.21 - Polycrystalline In-plane −80 6.2 2.3 1030 2.0 0.12 Polycrystalline Out-of-plane −84 11 1.2 630 1.8 0.10 materials-08-05315-t002_Table 2 Table 2 Seebeck coefficient (S), electrical resistivity (ρ), total thermal conductivity (κtotal), lattice thermal conductivity (κlat), power factor (S 2/ρ), and thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) in the in-plane (ab-plane) and out-of-plane (c-axis) directions of state-of-the-art misfit layered sulfides: [MS]1+m TS2 (M = La, Yb; T = Cr, Nb) [4,5]. Sample Direction T (K) ρ (μΩ·m) S (μV·K−1) κtotal (W·K−1·m−1) κlat(W·K−1·m−1) S 2/ρ (μW·K−2·m−1) ZT Reference (Yb2S2)0.62NbS2 In-plane 300 19.0 60 0.80 0.41 200 0.1 [5] (La2S2)0.62NbS2 In-plane 300 11.5 22 - - 50 - [5] (LaS)1.14NbS2 a In-plane 300 7.6 37 2.5 1.50 177 0.02 [4] 950 22.0 83 2.00 0.93 316 0.15 Out-of-plane 300 13.3 25 2.04 1.48 49 0.01 950 32.1 72 1.62 0.88 162 0.09 (LaS)1.14NbS2 b In-plane 300 5.2 35 4.88 3.45 233 0.02 [4] 950 16.9 83 3.25 1.86 405 0.12 Out-of-plane 300 9.3 25 1.56 0.75 70 0.01 950 28.5 56 1.34 0.52 111 0.08 (LaS)1.2CrS2 a In-plane 950 207 −172 1.16 1.04 143 0.11 [4] Out-of-plane 950 223 −174 1.02 0.91 137 0.13 (LaS)1.2CrS2 b In-plane 950 171 −172 1.25 1.11 174 0.14 [4] Out-of-plane 950 278 −154 0.92 0.84 84 0.08 a Small grains (~1 μm), weak/random orientation of grains; b Large grains (>20 μm), strong orientation of grains perpendicular to the pressing direction.

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          Large Thermoelectric Power Factor in TiS2 Crystal with Nearly Stoichiometric Composition

           Y. Kubo,  Y Shimakawa,  H Imai (2001)
          A TiS\(_{2}\) crystal with a layered structure was found to have a large thermoelectric power factor.The in-plane power factor \(S^{2}/ \rho\) at 300 K is 37.1~\(\mu\)W/K\(^{2}\)cm with resistivity (\(\rho\)) of 1.7 m\(\Omega\)cm and thermopower (\(S\)) of -251~\(\mu\)V/K, and this value is comparable to that of the best thermoelectric material, Bi\(_{2}\)Te\(_{3}\) alloy. The electrical resistivity shows both metallic and highly anisotropic behaviors, suggesting that the electronic structure of this TiS\(_{2}\) crystal has a quasi-two-dimensional nature. The large thermoelectric response can be ascribed to the large density of state just above the Fermi energy and inter-valley scattering. In spite of the large power factor, the figure of merit, \(ZT\) of TiS\(_{2}\) is 0.16 at 300 K, because of relatively large thermal conductivity, 68~mW/Kcm. However, most of this value comes from reducible lattice contribution. Thus, \(ZT\) can be improved by reducing lattice thermal conductivity, e.g., by introducing a rattling unit into the inter-layer sites.
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            Hierarchical Architecturing for Layered Thermoelectric Sulfides and Chalcogenides

            Sulfides are promising candidates for environment-friendly and cost-effective thermoelectric materials. In this article, we review the recent progress in all-length-scale hierarchical architecturing for sulfides and chalcogenides, highlighting the key strategies used to enhance their thermoelectric performance. We primarily focus on TiS2-based layered sulfides, misfit layered sulfides, homologous chalcogenides, accordion-like layered Sn chalcogenides, and thermoelectric minerals. CS2 sulfurization is an appropriate method for preparing sulfide thermoelectric materials. At the atomic scale, the intercalation of guest atoms/layers into host crystal layers, crystal-structural evolution enabled by the homologous series, and low-energy atomic vibration effectively scatter phonons, resulting in a reduced lattice thermal conductivity. At the nanoscale, stacking faults further reduce the lattice thermal conductivity. At the microscale, the highly oriented microtexture allows high carrier mobility in the in-plane direction, leading to a high thermoelectric power factor.
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              Microstructural Control and Thermoelectric Properties of Misfit Layered Sulfides (LaS)1+mTS2 (T = Cr, Nb): The Natural Superlattice Systems

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Materials (Basel)
                Materials (Basel)
                materials
                Materials
                MDPI
                1996-1944
                21 September 2015
                September 2015
                : 8
                : 9
                : 6482-6483
                Affiliations
                Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568, Japan; E-Mail: p.jood@ 123456aist.go.jp
                Author notes
                [* ]Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: ohta.michihiro@ 123456aist.go.jp ; Tel.: +81-29-861-5663; Fax: +81-29-861-5340.
                Article
                materials-08-05315
                10.3390/ma8095315
                5512922
                © 2015 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

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